Exercise

Publication Title: 
Canadian Family Physician Médecin De Famille Canadien

Becoming fit means preparing ourselves to cope more effectively with environmental stresses. Exercise programs represent one approach to the fitness struggle. There are alternatives for those who find regular exercise unappealing - Yoga, biofeedback training or self hypnosis. At the moment these techniques appear unscientific and spooky - but they work.

Author(s): 
Schatz, D.
Publication Title: 
Thorax

Eleven patients with severe chronic airways obstruction were given training in yogic breathing exercises and postures. A matched group of 11 patients were given physiotherapy breathing exercises. Both groups of patients were followed up at monthly intervals for nine months with pulmonary function tests, tests of exercise tolerance, and inquiry into their symptoms. After training in yoga the mean maximum work increased significantly by 60.55 kpm; whereas no such rise occurred after training in physiotherapy.

Author(s): 
Tandon, M. K.
Publication Title: 
Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology

Twelve normal healthy volunteers (6 males and 6 females) undergoing yoga training for 90 days were studied for the effect of yoga on exercise tolerance. Their ages ranged from 18 to 28 years. The volunteers were taught only Pranayama for the first 20 days and later on yogic asanas were added. Sub-maximal exercise tolerance test was done on a motorized treadmill by using Balke's modified protocol, initially, after 20 days (Phase-I) and after 90 days of yoga training (Phase-II).

Author(s): 
Raju, P. S.
Kumar, K. A.
Reddy, S. S.
Madhavi, S.
Gnanakumari, K.
Bhaskaracharyulu, C.
Reddy, M. V.
Annapurna, N.
Reddy, M. E.
Girijakumari, D.
Publication Title: 
Acta Psiquiátrica Y Psicológica De América Latina

In February 1984, it was decided to resort to non-verbal expressive techniques as a suitable way for doing group psychotherapy with psychotic patients. A corporal language technique was selected which comprised (a) sense-perception elements, (b) corporal expression, and (c) yoga, arranged in five-step sessions: space acknowledgment, deep-breathing exercise, palpation of an osteoarticular structure, motility test of the previously palpated zone, and expressive exercise.

Author(s): 
Jordan, N.
Publication Title: 
Diseases of the Colon and Rectum

In this study five volunteers with special training in anal sphincter exercise (Scandinavian Yoga School) managed voluntarily to reduce anal pressure. The mean reduction of anal pressure was 20 mm Hg. In one of the subjects, this was shown by manometry during low spinal anesthesia and electromyography to be caused by relaxation of the external anal sphincter.

Author(s): 
Brodén, G.
Dolk, A.
Frostell, C.
Nilsson, B.
Holmström, B.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness

LDH is a glycolytic enzyme utilised during exercise to provide energy to contracting muscles. Chronic submaximal exercise for a longer duration shows about two-fold increase in LDH levels. Yogic practises might be bringing similar effects. The present work was designed to study effect of yogic training on LDH levels. Fourteen female and six male students of average age or 18 years were subjected to yogic training for six weeks. Serum LDH levels were found before and after the training course by spectrophotometric method of Henry et al.

Author(s): 
Pansare, M. S.
Kulkarni, A. N.
Pendse, U. B.
Publication Title: 
Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine

A 46-year-old Caucasian male USAF aviator with a 6-year history of mild essential hypertension (medical waiver for flight duty) under unsuccessful treatment with hydrochlorothiazide, dietary modification, and exercise, was subsequently trained in yoga relaxation. After 6 weeks, medication had been discontinued, and his diastolic blood pressure remained within normal levels. The patient was subsequently returned to full flight status without recurrence of diastolic hypertension at followup 6 months later.

Author(s): 
Brownstein, A. H.
Dembert, M. L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Gerontology

The cardiovascular and behavioral adaptations associated with a 4-month program of aerobic exercise training were examined in 101 older men and women (mean age = 67 years). Subjects were randomly assigned to an Aerobic Exercise group, a Yoga and Flexibility control group, or a Waiting List control group. Prior to and following the 4-month program, subjects underwent comprehensive physiological and psychological evaluations.

Author(s): 
Blumenthal, J. A.
Emery, C. F.
Madden, D. J.
George, L. K.
Coleman, R. E.
Riddle, M. W.
McKee, D. C.
Reasoner, J.
Williams, R. S.
Publication Title: 
Psychology and Aging

The effects of aerobic exercise training in a sample of 85 older adults were investigated. Ss were assigned randomly to either an aerobic exercise group, a nonaerobic exercise (yoga) group, or a waiting-list control group. Following 16 weeks of the group-specific protocol, all of the older Ss received 16 weeks of aerobic exercise training. The older adults demonstrated a significant increase in aerobic capacity (cardiorespiratory fitness).

Author(s): 
Madden, D. J.
Blumenthal, J. A.
Allen, P. A.
Emery, C. F.
Publication Title: 
The Gerontologist

Data regarding perceived change were collected as part of a study of the effects of aerobic exercise training on psychological, cognitive, and physiological functioning among 101 healthy older adults. Subjects were assigned randomly to an aerobic exercise group, a yoga control group, or a waiting list group for 16 weeks, after which all subjects participated in aerobic exercise for another 16 weeks.

Author(s): 
Emery, C. F.
Blumenthal, J. A.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Exercise