Homeopathy

Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Nursing & Midwifery

Five focus groups (five female non-users; five male non-users; seven males, both users and non-users; seven female users; six male and female users) were conducted to get an idea of lay people's knowledge and attitudes to CAM. In each group, run by the same experienced moderator, various topics were systematically explored: knowledge of CAM treatments; attitudes towards CAM; personal experience of CAM; suggestions for bringing CAM into wider use.

Author(s): 
Furnham, Adrian
Publication Title: 
British Journal of Nursing (Mark Allen Publishing)

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is speculative and practitioners and policy makers question its validity in the care of people within the NHS. However, increasing numbers of people are using private CAM therapists to address their health needs. This has consequences in terms of cost to the patient, of using CAM instead of traditional health care, and for policy makers and educators raises questions of competency, regulation and research to validate its efficacy.

Author(s): 
Laurenson, Mary
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Obesity (2005)

The prevalence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate and a plethora of complementary therapies are on offer claiming effectiveness for reducing body weight. The aim of this systematic review is to critically assess the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews of complementary therapies for reducing body weight. Literature searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, Amed, and the Cochrane Library until January 2004. Hand-searches of relevant medical journals and bibliographies of identified articles were conducted.

Author(s): 
Pittler, M. H.
Ernst, E.
Publication Title: 
Reumatismo

Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for chronic conditions has increased in recent years. CAM is immensely popular for musculoskeletal conditions and patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) frequently try CAM. This review summarises the trial data for or against CAM as a symptomatic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Collectively the evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities show significant promise, e.g. acupuncture, diets, herbal medicine, homoeopathy, massage, supplements.

Author(s): 
Sarzi-Puttini, P.
Atzeni, F.
Lubrano, E.
Publication Title: 
The British Journal of Dermatology

Complementary medicine (CM) is more popular than ever before. Dermatology has not remained unaffected by this trend. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize all surveys of dermatological patients regarding the usage of CM. Three independent literature searches were carried out. Data were extracted in a predefined, standardized way and evaluated descriptively. Seven surveys met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Collectively they show a high but variable prevalence of CM. Lifetime prevalence ranged from 35 to 69%.

Author(s): 
Ernst, E.
Publication Title: 
Forschende Komplementarmedizin (2006)

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this literature review, performed within the framework of the Swiss governmental Program of Evaluation of Complementary Medicine (PEK), was to investigate costs of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted in 11 electronic databases. All retrieved titles and reference lists were also hand-searched. RESULTS: 38 publications were found: 23 on CAM of various definitions (medical and non-medical practitioners, over-the-counter products), 13 on homeopathy, 2 on phytotherapy.

Author(s): 
Maxion-Bergemann, Stefanie
Wolf, Martin
Bornhöft, Gudrun
Matthiessen, Peter F.
Wolf, Ursula
Publication Title: 
Clinical Therapeutics

BACKGROUND: In view of the high rates of off-label and unlicensed prescribing of drugs in children, the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Union have implemented legislative regulations for the pharmaceutical industry to increase the number of drugs with approved pediatric labeling.

Author(s): 
van Riet-Nales, Diana A.
Schobben, Alfred F. A. M.
Egberts, Toine C. G.
Rademaker, Carin M. A.
Publication Title: 
Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Complementary and alternative medicine is widely used in bronchial asthma. Data on efficacy of these treatment modalities are lacking. RECENT FINDINGS: Studies published since June 2002 on complementary and alternative medicine in bronchial asthma were systematically reviewed. SUMMARY: Studies do not support the use of homeopathy, air ionizers, manual therapy, or acupuncture for asthma. These methods bear some risks to patients related to undertreatment and side effects.

Author(s): 
Györik, Sándor A.
Brutsche, Martin H.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

In attempts to improve their health and/or combat illness, approximately 4 in 10 Americans will use a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapy this year. CAM therapies vary widely, with acupuncture, chiropractic, herbal medicine, and homeopathy among the more prominent modalities. CAM therapies are used in addition to and/or instead of the more conventional forms of medical care available in U.S. hospitals or licensed physicians' offices.

Author(s): 
Barrett, Bruce
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects approximately 2 to 3 million children in the United States. Stimulant medication is one of the most common treatments for ADHD; however, adverse reactions from its use cause many parents to seek complementary or alternative treatments. Many individuals use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) because they are attracted to CAM philosophies and health beliefs, dissatisfied with the process or results of their conventional care, or concerned about adverse effects of stimulants.

Author(s): 
Brue, Alan W.
Oakland, Thomas D.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Homeopathy