Homeopathy

Publication Title: 
The British Homoeopathic Journal

The aim of the study was to examine the activity of a new service providing a homeopathy clinic at a community hospital. This was initiated in a limited way and was served by a relatively inexperienced practitioner. A range of presenting complaints, treatments and outcomes are described. Funding has been maintained by the Health Authority and referrals have continued to be made by the local eligible General Practitioners. The outcomes have been quite good but the default rate has been disappointingly high.

Author(s): 
Neville-Smith, R.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Gastroenterology

OBJECTIVE: There is a perception of increasing and widespread use of alternative medicine for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We assessed the usage of alternative therapies among patients with IBD, whether there were similar or contrasting variables that were predictive of such use, and contrasted the use in four different centers in North America and Europe. METHODS: Patients in four IBD centers completed a self-administered questionnaire regarding alternative medicine. The centers were in Cork, Los Angeles, Stockholm, and Winnipeg.

Author(s): 
Rawsthorne, P.
Shanahan, F.
Cronin, N. C.
Anton, P. A.
Löfberg, R.
Bohman, L.
Bernstein, C. N.
Publication Title: 
The Nurse Practitioner

The number of Americans that use alternative therapies, including herbal products, is increasing by overwhelming proportions. Hundreds of herbal products and homeopathic remedies are available to the consumer, but most of these have not been proved safe or effective. Consumers are now turning to their health care provider for guidance concerning the quality, proper use, adverse effects, and precautions associated with these products.

Author(s): 
Glisson, J.
Crawford, R.
Street, S.
Publication Title: 
Medical Anthropology Quarterly

This article looks at the growth and use of homeopathic medicine in the city of Oaxaca, Mexico. Based on interviews with 174 male and female patients from half of the homeopathic clinics in the city, this research examined attitudes toward disease causation and how one stays healthy. Findings suggest that women are better at monitoring and trying to improve their health than are their male counterparts. Although homeopathy enjoys a strong and almost devoted following, women seem to be more convinced of the overall efficacy of homeopathic medicine than do men.

Author(s): 
Whiteford, M. B.
Publication Title: 
The British Homoeopathic Journal

OBJECTIVE: This study was aimed to evaluate the immuno-modulator role of homeopathic remedies in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. METHODOLOGY: A randomised double blind clinical trial was conducted to compare the effect of homeopathic remedies with placebo, on CD4+ve T-lymphocytes in HIV infected individuals, conforming to Centres for Disease Control (CDC) stage II & III. 100 HIV+ve individuals between 18-50 y (71% males) were included in the study.

Author(s): 
Rastogi, D. P.
Singh, V. P.
Singh, V.
Dey, S. K.
Rao, K.
Publication Title: 
The British Homoeopathic Journal

This article voices concern at the trend among an influential section of homeopaths the world over, to jettison Hahnemann's similimum principle and replace it with Kent's almost exclusive concentration on mental and psychic symptoms. This concern raises the question whether Kent was a true Hahnemannian. In order to discuss this question, two schools of thoughts are investigated. The first argues that Hahnemann's theories were scientific whereas Kent's were metaphysical. The second criticises Kent's more severely for being metaphysical.

Author(s): 
Cassam, A.
Publication Title: 
Prescrire International

A meta-analysis published in the Lancet in September 1997 cautiously concluded that homeopathic drug activity is not fully explained by the placebo effect. A thorough examination of this meta-analysis reveals design errors that make the results untrustworthy. There is still nothing to suggest that homeopathic drugs are any more effective than a placebo.

Publication Title: 
Health Marketing Quarterly

A major philosophical shift continues to occur in how health care is delivered in the United States. Traditional western medicine continues to develop new technologies that require new delivery systems, however, other factors are affecting this shift as well. Alternative medicine is one of these factors and is rapidly gaining attention. Alternative medicine is comprised of homeopathy, chiropractic, naturopathy, and cultural beliefs and practices such as those of the Native Americans or the Mexican Folk healers.

Author(s): 
Montoya, I. D.
Publication Title: 
Advances in Therapy

The efficacy of three plants used in homeopathy to treat acute tonsillitis was evaluated. A fixed combination of three plant substances (Phytolacca americana, Guajacum officinale, Capsicum annuum) was used in either solid (tablet) or liquid (drop) formulation: 107 patients were treated and no antibiotics were used. The objective and subjective symptoms of acute tonsillitis were noted. A significant decrease in symptoms was observed as early as 2.5 days after treatment startup; no serious adverse effects were reported.

Author(s): 
Wiesenauer, M.
Publication Title: 
Forschende Komplementärmedizin

Stimulation or regulation therapies are old therapeutic procedures based on models reaching back to traditional medical faculties in ancient times and in the Middle Ages. Among this heterogeneous group are acupuncture, purgative procedures (especially the Aschner methods), autohemotherapy, fasting therapy, homeopathy, microbiological and physical therapies. The basic principle underlying all of these procedures is that stimulants applied in proper doses to the organism elicit counterregulation. The counterregulation stimulates 'self-healing processes' within the organism.

Author(s): 
Asefi, M.
Augustin, M.

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