Prayer

Reviews the book, The Psychology of Prayer by A. L. Strong (see record 1909-10306-000). The author regards the imaginative relation of selves as an outcome of genuine need and as one which may easily be set up even though the subject does not believe in the possibility of an actual response from some superior being.

Author(s): 
King, Irving
Publication Title: 
Psychological Bulletin

Reviews the article Magic and Religion by J. H. Leuba (1909). Two theses are supported in this article: (1) The primary forms of magic probably antedated religion; (2) whether magic antedated religion or not, religion arose independently of magic; they are different in principle and independent in origin. While magic and religion may be combined as in a prayer addressed to a personal being, they never fuse.

Author(s): 
J, J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Educational Psychology

Reviews the book, The Psychology of Prayer by Anna Louise Strong (see record 1909-10306-000). In her booklet of seven sections, the author maintains her theory of prayer as a form of the imaginative social process. It has for its end, the construction of a wider self. Many of the so-called objective results of prayer are attained indirectly through the construction of a more confident self, through a better interpretation of the circumstances involved, or through subconscious activities in a variety of forms. Prayers for the sick have a therapeutic effect.

Author(s): 
Stolz, Karl
Publication Title: 
Psychological Bulletin

Reviews the book, A Study in the Psychology of Ritualism by Frederick Goodrich Henke (see record 1910-10191-000). This study is a suggestive application of social psychology to the important phenomena of ritualism, not only in primitive, but also in developed, religion. A wealth of concrete anthropological material is first presented, showing the close relation of ritual to the general life. Then the operation of the fundamental instincts is traced. Comparative psychology is cited as the field in which we may look for the impulses in early human society.

Author(s): 
S, E.
Publication Title: 
Psychological Bulletin

In the article "An empirical study of prayer", by James Bissett Pratt (Amer. J. of Relig. Psychol. and Educ., 1910, 4, 47-67), the questionnaire method is used to address the questions: "In what do people's prayers actually consist? What is their nature and content? How are they used? and How well do they serve their purpose?" This brief review examines the results of the study.

Author(s): 
M, C.
Publication Title: 
Psychological Bulletin

Reviews the book "Religion and Magic" (1914) by K. Beth. This book is in substance an attempt to demonstrate the independence of religion from magic with regard to its origin and its nature. In the first chapters are discussed the theories of Frazer, Marett, Preuss, and Vierkandt, in so far as they regard magic as a forerunner of religion, either because magic passed into religion, or because the failure of magic became the incentive to the development of religion.

Author(s): 
Leuba, James H.
Publication Title: 
Psychological Bulletin

Reviews the book The significance of psychoanalysis for the mental sciences by O. Rank and H. Sachs (Trans. by C. R. Payne; New York: Nerv. & Ment. Dis. Pub. Co., 1916). In this monograph Rank and Sachs attempt to apply concretely, in the fields of social and folk psychology, the Freudian conception that the processes and products of civilization are essentially the modified or sublimated expression of infantile sexual tendencies that somehow escaped repression. Three points are emphasized throughout.

Author(s): 
No authorship indicated
Publication Title: 
Journal of Applied Psychology

Reviews the book, Religion and the Mind of To-day by Joseph A. Leighton. The author believes that, under the guidance of the special sciences, a new civilization is coming into being and that a reconstruction or intellectual recasting of our inherited religion and social ethics to guide and inspire this civilization is imperative. Professor Leighton here undertakes this recasting and places the essential teachings of Christianity in the setting of modern scientific thought and problems.

Author(s): 
Garnertsfelder, Walter S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Educational Psychology

Reviews the book, Teaching English in High Schools by Russell A. Sharp (1924). The reviewer states that this recent addition to the Riverside Educational Monographs is described by its author as a "sheaf of gleanings from a dozen years at the teacher's desk." It contains chapters on the preparation of the teacher of English, the objectives of English, the course of study, problems in teaching the classics and composition, reading and spelling, fads and reforms, segregation, and extra-curricular activities.

Author(s): 
H, M.
Publication Title: 
Psychological Bulletin

Reviews the book, La Religion et La Foi by H. Delacroix (1922). The reviewer notes that this book is concerned with the several forms of religious faith: Implicit or Naive faith, and with the several Faith, and the Faith of Trust (confidence). The influence of the religious society and of the practice of the religious rites constitutes a double source of Implicit Faith (pp. 1-91). The former, called by Delacroix the culte extatique, is concerned with the exciting effect of the crowd; it gives rise to confused states of mind which lend themselves to a spiritual interpretation.

Author(s): 
Durling, Dorothy

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Prayer