Taiji Chuan

Publication Title: 
Archives of General Psychiatry

Thirty-three patients in long-term individual therapy were referred to one of three weekend groups: two experimental (affect-arousing, gestalt therapy) groups and one control (meditation-Tai Chi) group. The impact of the weekend group experience (WGE) on individual therapy was examined six and 12 weeks later. At six weeks the patients in the experimental groups showed, on some measures, a significantly greater improvement in their individual therapy than did controls. By 12 weeks, there were no demonstrable differences.

Author(s): 
Yalom, I. D.
Bond, G.
Bloch, S.
Zimmerman, E.
Friedman, L.
Publication Title: 
Pain

Effects of electroacupuncture on the jaw opening reflex after tooth pulp stimulation were investigated in lightly anesthetized rats. Electroacupuncture stimulation (45 Hz, 5 msec) was delivered to 8 meridian points and 6 nonmeridian ones for 15 min so as to compare the degree of suppression elicited from each point. Significant suppressive effects on the reflex were observed in the cases of Yin-Hsiang, Ho-Ku and Shou-Sanli stimulation and these effects were antagonized by naloxone.

Author(s): 
Toda, K.
Suda, H.
Ichioka, M.
Iriki, A.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Chinese Medicine

Tai Chi Chuan, a mind-body relaxation exercise, was devised by Chang San Feng for meditation and self-defense in the thirteenth century A.D. The 108 forms are performed in a slow relaxed manner, taking 30 minutes altogether. Practitioners of Tai Chi claim that it promotes health and cures certain illnesses but this has not been substantiated and therefore further research into its health benefits is warranted.

Author(s): 
Koh, T. C.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Chinese Medicine

The philosophical tradition of Chinese geriatrics contains a strong preventive element closely tied to the concept of a balanced man-nature relationship and body-mind relationship. It has been emphasized that a sound mind in a sound body is essential to longevity. Moderation in physical and emotional activities is encouraged. There have been a number of approaches to longevity in traditional Chinese medicine.

Author(s): 
Zhou, D. H.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Chinese Medicine

On the suggestion of a Chinese physician the author took up Tai Chi, a traditional Chinese exercise, in an attempt to relieve symptoms from his moderately severe ankylosing spondylitis. Conventional medical therapy, used over a 15 year period, had proven of only limited benefit. Tai Chi consists of a series of intricate exercise sequences, and after 2 1/2 years of daily practice the author now feels stronger and healthier than before. Pain, weakness and general malaise return if practice is neglected for as little as one week.

Author(s): 
Koh, T. C.
Publication Title: 
Canadian Journal of Applied Sport Sciences. Journal Canadien Des Sciences Appliquées Au Sport

Tai Chi Chuan is a form of traditional Chinese exercise which has been widely practised in China for preventive and therapeutic purposes. The present study was designed to determine the physiological demands of this exercise modality. Eleven healthy males, aged 28.4 years, were studied for oxygen cost and related metabolic variables, heart rate and blood pressure during the performance of the Long-Form Tai Chi Chuan of Yang's style.

Author(s): 
Zhuo, D.
Shephard, R. J.
Plyley, M. J.
Davis, G. M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Psychosomatic Research

Changes in psychological and physiological functioning following participation in Tai Chi were assessed for 33 beginners and 33 practitioners. The variables in the three-way factorial design were experience (beginners vs practitioners), time (morning vs afternoon vs evening), and phase (before Tai Chi vs during Tai Chi vs after Tai Chi). Phase was a repeated measures variable. Relative to measures taken beforehand, practice of Tai Chi raised heart rate, increased noradrenaline excretion in urine, and decreased salivary cortisol concentration.

Author(s): 
Jin, P.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation / Association of Academic Physiatrists

The safety of a traditional Chinese exercise, Tai-Chi Chuan, on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients was evaluated. RA patients, who received 1 h of Tai-Chi Chuan instruction once (n = 20) and twice (n = 15) a week for 10 consecutive wk in two separate studies, showed no deterioration in their clinical disease activities compared with the corresponding controls (n = 11 and 9, respectively). Testing parameters included joint tenderness, joint swelling, time to walk 50 feet, handgrip strength and a written functional assessment.

Author(s): 
Kirsteins, A. E.
Dietz, F.
Hwang, S. M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Psychosomatic Research

Tai Chi, a moving meditation, is examined for its efficacy in post-stressor recovery. Forty-eight male and 48 female Tai Chi practitioners were randomly assigned to four treatment groups: Tai Chi, brisk walking, mediation and neutral reading. Mental arithmetic and other difficult tests were chosen as mental challenges, and a stressful film was used to produce emotional disturbance. Tai Chi and the other treatments were applied after these stressors. After all treatments, the salivary cortisol level dropped significantly, and the mood states were also improved.

Author(s): 
Jin, P.
Publication Title: 
Hawaii Medical Journal

Every piece of literature or book about tai chi claims it to be the supreme martial art (soft style) and a therapeutic exercise. Nevertheless, none of the authors can describe scientifically how and why it works. Many people did not gain any health benefit in practicing tai chi and only very few people were able to apply its legendary secret power. During the last 10 years, the author thought he had discovered the secret in Hong Kong and brought it to Los Angeles. The secret lies in the fundamental movements of the body, called tai chi basic exercise routines.

Author(s): 
Ng, R. K.

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