Women's Studies

Publication Title: 
Journal of Applied Psychology

Little is known about how discrimination manifests before individuals formally apply to organizations or how it varies within and between organizations. We address this knowledge gap through an audit study in academia of over 6,500 professors at top U.S. universities drawn from 89 disciplines and 259 institutions. In our experiment, professors were contacted by fictional prospective students seeking to discuss research opportunities prior to applying to a doctoral program.

Author(s): 
Milkman, Katherine L.
Akinola, Modupe
Chugh, Dolly
Publication Title: 
Journal of Educational Psychology

In the past 40 years, the proportion of women in science courses and careers has dramatically increased in some nations but not in others. Our research investigated how national differences in women’s science participation related to gender-science stereotypes that associate science with men more than women. Data from ?350,000 participants in 66 nations indicated that higher female enrollment in tertiary science education (community college or above) related to weaker explicit and implicit national gender-science stereotypes.

Author(s): 
Miller, David I.
Eagly, Alice H.
Linn, Marcia C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Diversity in Higher Education

The representative bureaucracy theory posits that the passive representation of women in an organization leads to their active representation in terms of gender equity in policy implementation. The present study examines how women’s representation in administration and faculty positions may explain gender equity-oriented policy outcomes, focusing on compliance with Title IX of the Educational Amendments to the Civil Rights Acts in intercollegiate athletics.

Author(s): 
Lee, Young-joo
Won, Doyeon
Publication Title: 
Journal of Educational Psychology

In the past 40 years, the proportion of women in science courses and careers has dramatically increased in some nations but not in others. Our research investigated how national differences in women’s science participation related to gender-science stereotypes that associate science with men more than women. Data from ?350,000 participants in 66 nations indicated that higher female enrollment in tertiary science education (community college or above) related to weaker explicit and implicit national gender-science stereotypes.

Author(s): 
Miller, David I.
Eagly, Alice H.
Linn, Marcia C.
Author(s): 
Alic, Margaret
Publication Title: 
Journal of Research in Science Teaching

In order to change the attitude of early adolescent female and male students toward scientists and women in science, students in the middle school/junior high grades were exposed over a two months' period to women science career role models as part of their science instruction. This treatment positively affected the students' attitude toward scientists and toward women in science.

Author(s): 
Smith, Walter S.
Erb, Thomas Owen

This paper contends that the climate or culture of academic science has been chilly to women, ethnic minorities, and people with disabilities. The paper reviews research findings in three areas: (1) numbers of women participating in science education and careers; (2) evidence of precollege patterns for girls and women in science and math; and (3) studies on how women are faring in college as undergraduate and graduate students and as faculty members.

Author(s): 
Ginorio, Angela B.
Publication Title: 
Top researchers debate the evidence. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association
Author(s): 
Ceci, Stephen J.
Williams, Wendy M.
Author(s): 
Abir-Am, Pnina G.
Outram, Dorinda
Publication Title: 
American Scientist
Author(s): 
Brush, Stephen G.

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