Women's Studies

Publication Title: 
Dynamis (Granada, Spain)

The development of philosophical medicine in the high and late Middle Ages brought with it a powerful association of medical knowledge with the written word. To possess books, or at least to have access to books, was both a prerequisite for and a symbol of the kind of theoretical learning that distinguished the learned practitioner from the empiric. This study examines evidence for women's access to medical books, raising the question of what difference gender made. I argue that, for the most part, women did not own medical books, whether they were laywomen or religious.

Author(s): 
Green, M. H.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Research

Thirty women of varying ethnicity and socioeconomic status, who were actively seeking to avoid pregnancy, were interviewed concerning their lifetime experience with contraceptive use. The resulting description, Women's Contraceptive Self-Care, was divided into four processes: the central process, Choosing and Using Contraception, and three contextual processes. Forestalling Pregnancy was defined as using contraceptive methods or behaviors to prevent or delay childbearing.

Author(s): 
Lethbridge, D. J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Nursing

AIM: The aim was to illuminate the meaning of women's experiences of living with urinary incontinence (UI). BACKGROUND: Living with long-term UI means a variety of consequences for everyday life. Women's narratives about their lived experiences are important in enabling nurses to better understand and to help women achieve symptom control. No previous study could be found that has focused on the meaning of women's experience of living with UI from a symptom management perspective.

Author(s): 
Hägglund, Doris
Ahlström, Gerd
Publication Title: 
Studies in Family Planning

This article examines data from a study on garment-factory workers in Bangladesh to explore the implications of work for the early socialization of young women. For the first time, large numbers of young Bangladeshi women are being given an alternative to lives in which they move directly from childhood to adulthood through early marriage and childbearing. Employment creates a period of transition in contrast to the abrupt assumption of adult roles at very young ages that marriage and childbearing mandate.

Author(s): 
Amin, S.
Diamond, I.
Naved, R. T.
Newby, M.
Publication Title: 
L'Encéphale

The purpose of this empirical study is to analyze modalities of announcing the end of attempts at in vitro ferti-lization to women who, for various reasons, were not able to have a child after several trials. What are the problems physicians face when, in the course of their work, they make these announcements? How do they give (or not give) support to these women who have placed so much hope in this technique? These are some of the questions that led the authors to conduct this empirical study within the framework of a clinical and qualitative approach to work psychology.

Author(s): 
Santiago-Delefosse, M.
Cahen, F.
Coeffin-Driol, C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Women & Aging

Older Iranian women, who immigrated to Canada in later adulthood, experience unique issues as they age. In order to better understand this experience, in-depth, personal and semi-structured interviews were conducted with five immigrant/refugee Iranian women who immigrated to Canada in their later life.

Author(s): 
Shemirani, Farimah Shakeri
O'Connor, Deborah L.
Publication Title: 
Health Care for Women International

In this ethnographic study, I examine personal, kinship, and social obligations and the role of women in the traditional Thai family. Under what circumstances do women take on the responsibility to care or not care, and how do they cope with the disease and care when they are also infected? Fifteen women who were afflicted or affected by HIV/AIDS participated in in-depth interviews and participant observations. Analysis employed mainly qualitative methods following Spradley.

Author(s): 
Songwathana, P.
Publication Title: 
Rural and Remote Health

INTRODUCTION: Available work from North America indicates that same-sex attracted (SSA) individuals enjoy aspects of rural life but nonetheless report encountering homophobia and experiencing isolation from SSA networks. The experience of prejudice and social isolation are often associated with psycho-social distress among the general population of same-sex attracted individuals. Little is known of how SSA women experience life in rural areas of Australia and how this influences their psycho-social wellbeing.

Author(s): 
Edwards, Jane
Publication Title: 
Research in Population Economics
Author(s): 
Spitze, G. D.
Waite, L. J.
Publication Title: 
Obstetrical & Gynecological Survey
Author(s): 
Sullivan, R.

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