Women's Studies

Publication Title: 
Women and Birth: Journal of the Australian College of Midwives

BACKGROUND: A number of studies have found increased use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) during pregnancy and birth. However, little is known about women's motivation in seeking CAM during pregnancy or their experiences of use in relation to their pregnancy and childbirth journey. METHODS: A narrative study sought to explore the meaning and significance of CAM use in pregnancy from the perspective of CAM users. Narrative style interviews were conducted with 14 women who had used a range of CAMs during pregnancy and birth.

Author(s): 
Mitchell, Mary
Publication Title: 
Critical Care Medicine

BACKGROUND: Critical illness is a crisis for the total person, not just for the physical body. Patients and their loved ones often reflect on spiritual, religious, and existential questions when seriously ill. Surveys have demonstrated that most patients wish physicians would concern themselves with their patients' spiritual and religious needs, thus indicating that this part of their care has been neglected or avoided.

Author(s): 
Todres, I. David
Catlin, Elizabeth A.
Thiel, Mary Martha
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Academy of Religion. American Academy of Religion

How did foreign Christian anti-footbinding activists treat the distinctive forms of human embodiment they encountered in China? What were their assumptions? How should we understand the transition from religious to secular imaginings of the body and its pains? Here I discuss late nineteenth and early twentieth century religion and medicalized hygiene through the voices of two English people who campaigned against and wrote extensively about footbinding.

Author(s): 
Zito, Angela
Publication Title: 
Intensive & Critical Care Nursing: The Official Journal of the British Association of Critical Care Nurses

This paper explores Muslim women's experiences of suffering in Jordanian intensive care units. A narrative approach was employed to access women's stories of their critical illness. Sixteen women who had spent at least 48 hours in intensive care were recruited from two hospitals in a Jordanian city and took part in between one and three interviews over a six-month period. Women's accounts of suffering were pervaded with physical, social, spiritual and technological themes.

Author(s): 
Zeilani, Ruqayya
Seymour, Jane E.
Publication Title: 
The Medical Journal of Australia

Providing spiritual care is about tapping into the concept of spirituality: core meaning, deepest life meaning, hope and connectedness. The search for meaning, connectedness and hope becomes more significant as older people are faced with the possibilities of frailty, disability and dementia. Spirituality, ageing and meaning in life can be discussed in the context of an alternative view of "successful ageing". A model of spiritual tasks in older age can help explain the spiritual dimension and provide a starting point for spiritual assessment.

Author(s): 
MacKinlay, Elizabeth B.
Trevitt, Corinne
Publication Title: 
Medicine, Health Care, and Philosophy

This paper explores the role of religious belief in public debate about physician-assisted dying and argues that the role is essential because any discussion about the way we die raises the deepest questions about the meaning of human life and death. For religious people, such questions are essentially religious ones, even when the religious elements are framed in secular political or philosophical language. The paper begins by reviewing some of the empirical data about religious belief and practice in the United States and Europe.

Author(s): 
Stempsey, William E.
Publication Title: 
South Asia Bulletin
Author(s): 
Shaheed, F.
Publication Title: 
Planned Parenthood Challenges / International Planned Parenthood Federation
Author(s): 
Tadiar, F. M.
Publication Title: 
Studies in Comparative International Development
Author(s): 
Draper, E.
Publication Title: 
Community Health Studies

A content analysis was carried out on obstetric and gynaecological textbooks recommended for medical students at four Australian universities. The texts were read for a hidden curriculum of sexist ideology. This study is a partial replication of a study carried out by Scully and Bart in the United States eighteen years ago. The findings of Scully and Bart demonstrated that obstetric and gynaecological texts contained outdated and erroneous views about women's sexuality and portrayed women in stereotyped roles.

Author(s): 
Koutroulis, G.

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