Complementary medicine for depression
Language: 
English
Abstract: 

Surveys have demonstrated that complementary medicine use for depression is widespread, although patterns of use vary. A series of systematic reviews provide a summary of the current evidence for acupuncture, aromatherapy and massage, homeopathy, meditation, reflexology, herbal medicine, yoga, and several dietary supplements and relaxation techniques. The quantity and quality of individual studies vary widely, but research interest in complementary therapies is increasing, particularly in herbal and nutritional products. Major questions are still to be answered with respect to the effectiveness and appropriate role of these therapies in the management of depression. Areas for further research and some of the potential challenges to research design are discussed. Finally, several ongoing developments in information provision on this topic are highlighted.

Author(s): 
Pilkington, Karen
Rampes, Hagen
Richardson, Janet
Item Type: 
Journal Article
Publication Title: 
Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics
Journal Abbreviation: 
Expert Rev Neurother
Publication Date: 
2006-11
Publication Year: 
2006
Pages: 
1741-1751
Volume: 
6
Issue: 
11
ISSN: 
1744-8360
DOI: 
10.1586/14737175.6.11.1741
Library Catalog: 
PubMed
Extra: 
PMID: 17144787

Turabian/Chicago Citation

Karen Pilkington, Hagen Rampes and Janet Richardson. 2006-11. "Complementary medicine for depression." Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics 6: 11: 1741-1751. 10.1586/14737175.6.11.1741.

Wikipedia Citation

<ref> {{Cite journal | doi = 10.1586/14737175.6.11.1741 | issn = 1744-8360 | volume = 6 | pages = 1741-1751 | last = Pilkington | first = Karen | coauthors = Rampes, Hagen, Richardson, Janet | title = Complementary medicine for depression | journal = Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics | date = 2006-11 | pmid = | pmc = }} </ref>