[Hypnosis in ophthalmology]
Language: 
ita
Abstract: 

Hypnosis is able to induce a state of total psychological calm in very many subjects, including maintenance or even enhancement of their ability to cooperate. A smaller number of more receptive subjects may even achieve ocular anaesthesia, though this is not suitable for the performance of operations because the Dagnini-Aschner reflex persists and hypotonia is not attained. It is considered, therefore, that the association of hypnosis, retrobulbar pharmacological anaesthesia, and akinesia offers the best conditions for the performance of operations involving major opening of the eyeball, such as those associated with cataract, i.e. psychological tranquility with the ability to cooperate, anaesthesia with neurovegetative areflexia, hypotonia, and a postoperative course undisturbed by coughing and vomiting. The results of several years' experience have shown the complete suitability of the method and its wide possibilities of application.

Author(s): 
Bucalossi, A.
Item Type: 
Journal Article
Publication Title: 
Minerva Medica
Journal Abbreviation: 
Minerva Med.
Publication Date: 
11/3/1975
Publication Year: 
1975
Pages: 
3898-3901
Volume: 
66
Issue: 
74
ISSN: 
0026-4806
Library Catalog: 
PubMed
Extra: 
PMID: 1187037

Turabian/Chicago Citation

A. Bucalossi. 11/3/1975. "[Hypnosis in ophthalmology]." Minerva Medica 66: 74: 3898-3901.

Wikipedia Citation

<ref> {{Cite journal | doi = | issn = 0026-4806 | volume = 66 | pages = 3898-3901 | last = Bucalossi | first = A. | coauthors = | title = [Hypnosis in ophthalmology] | journal = Minerva Medica | date = 11/3/1975 | pmid = | pmc = }} </ref>