Longevity factor in hominoid social organization
Language: 
English
Abstract: 

In most primate groups emigration of the maturing young of one or the other sex tends to serve as an incest avoidance mechanism. Among most primate species it is the males who change groups. This supports the theory that, in terms of reproductive success, males should compete for mates and females should compete for resources. In hominoids the combination of increased longevity and greater female discrimination in mate selection seems responsible for female emigration. This may relate to the high frequency of patrilocality and male control of resources among human groups.

Author(s): 
Stephens, M. E.
Item Type: 
Journal Article
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Physical Anthropology
Journal Abbreviation: 
Am. J. Phys. Anthropol.
Publication Date: 
1990-03
Publication Year: 
1990
Pages: 
357-361
Volume: 
81
Issue: 
3
ISSN: 
0002-9483
DOI: 
10.1002/ajpa.1330810305
Library Catalog: 
NCBI Published Medical (?)
Extra: 
PMID: 2327477

Turabian/Chicago Citation

M. E. Stephens. 1990-03. "Longevity factor in hominoid social organization." American Journal of Physical Anthropology 81: 3: 357-361. 10.1002/ajpa.1330810305.

Wikipedia Citation

<ref> {{Cite journal | doi = 10.1002/ajpa.1330810305 | issn = 0002-9483 | volume = 81 | pages = 357-361 | last = Stephens | first = M. E. | coauthors = | title = Longevity factor in hominoid social organization | journal = American Journal of Physical Anthropology | date = 1990-03 | pmid = | pmc = }} </ref>