Non-hormonal interventions for hot flushes in women with a history of breast cancer
Language: 
English
Abstract: 

BACKGROUND: Hot flushes are common in women with a history of breast cancer. Hormonal therapies are known to reduce these symptoms but are not recommended in women with a history of breast cancer due to their potential adverse effects. The efficacy of non-hormonal therapies is still uncertain. OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy of non-hormonal therapies in reducing hot flushes in women with a history of breast cancer. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Breast Cancer Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, CINAHL, PsycINFO (August 2008) and WHO ICTRP Search Portal. We handsearched reference lists of reviews and included articles, reviewed conference proceedings and contacted experts. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing non-hormonal therapies with placebo or no therapy for reducing hot flushes in women with a history of breast cancer. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors independently selected potentially relevant studies, decided upon their inclusion and extracted data on participant characteristics, interventions, outcomes and the risk of bias of included studies. MAIN RESULTS: Sixteen RCTs met our inclusion criteria. We included six studies on selective serotonin (SSRI) and serotonin-norepinephrine (SNRI) reuptake inhibitors, two on clonidine, one on gabapentin, two each on relaxation therapy and homeopathy, and one each on vitamin E, magnetic devices and acupuncture. The risk of bias of most studies was rated as low or moderate. Data on continuous outcomes were presented inconsistently among studies, which precluded the possibility of pooling the results. Three pharmacological treatments (SSRIs and SNRIs, clonidine and gabapentin) reduced the number and severity of hot flushes. One study assessing vitamin E did not show any beneficial effect. One of two studies on relaxation therapy showed a significant benefit. None of the other non-pharmacological therapies had a significant benefit. Side-effects were inconsistently reported. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Clonidine, SSRIs and SNRIs, gabapentin and relaxation therapy showed a mild to moderate effect on reducing hot flushes in women with a history of breast cancer.

Author(s): 
Rada, Gabriel
Capurro, Daniel
Pantoja, Tomas
Corbalán, Javiera
Moreno, Gladys
Letelier, Luz M.
Vera, Claudio
Item Type: 
Journal Article
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Journal Abbreviation: 
Cochrane Database Syst Rev
Publication Date: 
9/8/2010
Publication Year: 
2010
Pages: 
CD004923
Issue: 
9
ISSN: 
1469-493X
DOI: 
10.1002/14651858.CD004923.pub2
Library Catalog: 
PubMed
Extra: 
PMID: 20824841

Turabian/Chicago Citation

Gabriel Rada, Daniel Capurro, Tomas Pantoja, Javiera Corbalán, Gladys Moreno, Luz M. Letelier and Claudio Vera. 9/8/2010. "Non-hormonal interventions for hot flushes in women with a history of breast cancer." The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 9: CD004923. 10.1002/14651858.CD004923.pub2.

Wikipedia Citation

<ref> {{Cite journal | doi = 10.1002/14651858.CD004923.pub2 | issn = 1469-493X | volume = | pages = CD004923 | last = Rada | first = Gabriel | coauthors = Capurro, Daniel, Pantoja, Tomas, Corbalán, Javiera, Moreno, Gladys, Letelier, Luz M., Vera, Claudio | title = Non-hormonal interventions for hot flushes in women with a history of breast cancer | journal = The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews | date = 9/8/2010 | pmid = | pmc = }} </ref>