Sex, culture and the anthropologist
Language: 
English
Abstract: 

The apocalyptic threat of AIDS, combined with recent ethnological developments, is promoting an anthropological "rediscovery of sex." If this rediscovery is to have important and lasting effects on the development of theory, a stock-taking is in order--one which examines anthropology's historical, methodological, and practical relationship to the study of sexual behavior. Parallel theoretical directions taken in both American and British anthropology, starting in the late 1920's, resulted in a disciplinary departure from the study of sexuality, as such; sexual behavior became shielded from analytic view by a more abstract, propositional approach to society and culture. In addition to reviewing these historical trends, the paper considers elements of personal privacy and intrasocietal variation in the anthropology of sex and, with illustrations taken from the Ilahita Arapesh of northeastern Papua New Guinea, proposes that the locus of sexual behavior and experience lies in the interaction of cultural ideas and psychobiological impulses.

Author(s): 
Tuzin, D.
Item Type: 
Journal Article
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)
Journal Abbreviation: 
Soc Sci Med
Publication Date: 
1991
Publication Year: 
1991
Pages: 
867-874
Volume: 
33
Issue: 
8
ISSN: 
0277-9536
Library Catalog: 
PubMed
Extra: 
PMID: 1745913

Turabian/Chicago Citation

D. Tuzin. 1991. "Sex, culture and the anthropologist." Social Science & Medicine (1982) 33: 8: 867-874.

Wikipedia Citation

<ref> {{Cite journal | doi = | issn = 0277-9536 | volume = 33 | pages = 867-874 | last = Tuzin | first = D. | coauthors = | title = Sex, culture and the anthropologist | journal = Social Science & Medicine (1982) | date = 1991 | pmid = | pmc = }} </ref>