Abortion, Therapeutic

Publication Title: 
Journal of obstetric, gynecologic, and neonatal nursing: JOGNN

OBJECTIVES: To determine what evidence exists to support the practice of viewing the deceased fetus by women terminating pregnancy for fetal anomalies. DATA SOURCES: Electronic databases searched (1966-2007) were Medline, PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Dissertation Abstracts Index. STUDY SELECTION: Literature was reviewed that either directly or parenthetically dealt with the emotional effects on women of viewing the fetus post termination of pregnancy for fetal anomalies. DATA EXTRACTION: No randomized or controlled trials were found.

Author(s): 
Sloan, Eileen P.
Kirsh, Sharon
Mowbray, Mary
Publication Title: 
Bulletin of the History of Medicine

By 1800, the Roman Catholic Church and organized medicine faced the dilemma of how to resolve cases of obstructed births. American physicians usually practiced destructive operations, like craniotomy, in an attempt to save the lives of mothers. The church allowed such operations after the death of the infant. A new technique of surgery, the cesarean operation, offered hope that both patients would survive childbirth.

Author(s): 
Ryan, Joseph G.
Publication Title: 
Salud Publica De Mexico

OBJECTIVE: In the last decade, important advances were made in the struggle for reproductive rights in Mexico. The goal of this study was to discover the opinions of decision-makers about the grounds for legal abortion as well as to explore their perceptions about further liberalization of abortion laws countrywide. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In-depth interviews were conducted with eight prominent decision-makers working in governmental health, law and social institutions as well as representatives of political parties.

Author(s): 
van Dijk, Marieke G.
Lara, Diana
GarcÌa, Sandra G.
Publication Title: 
Reproductive Health Matters

Issues arising from the death of Savita Halappanavar in Ireland in October 2012 include the question of whether it is unethical to refuse to terminate a non-viable pregnancy when the woman's life may be at risk. In Catholic maternity services, this decision intersects with health professionals' interpretation of Catholic health policy on treatment of miscarriage as well as the law on abortion. This paper explores how these issues came together around Savita's death and the consequences for pregnant women and maternity services worldwide.

Author(s): 
Berer, Marge
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