Adolescent Psychology

Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Psychiatry

OBJECTIVE: Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) has been increasingly used to examine striatal neurochemistry in adult major depressive disorder. This study extends the use of this modality to pediatric major depression to test the hypothesis that adolescents with major depression have elevated concentrations of striatal choline and creatine and lower concentrations of N-acetylaspartate.

Author(s): 
Gabbay, Vilma
Hess, David A.
Liu, Songtao
Babb, James S.
Klein, Rachel G.
Gonen, Oded
Publication Title: 
BMC medical education

BACKGROUND: Training in communication skills for health professionals is important, but there are substantial barriers to individual in-person training for practicing clinicians. We evaluated the feasibility and desirability of on-line training and sought suggestions for future courses.

Author(s): 
Kemper, Kathi J.
Foy, Jane M.
Wissow, Larry
Shore, Steve
Publication Title: 
Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

Religious/spiritual (R/S) coping has been associated with health outcomes in chronically ill adults; however, little is known about how adolescents use R/S to cope with a chronic illness such as sickle cell disease (SCD). Using a mixed method approach (quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews), we examined R/S coping, spirituality, and health-related quality of life in 48 adolescents with SCD and 42 parents of adolescents with SCD.

Author(s): 
Cotton, Sian
Grossoehme, Daniel
Rosenthal, Susan L.
McGrady, Meghan E.
Roberts, Yvonne Humenay
Hines, Janelle
Yi, Michael S.
Tsevat, Joel
Publication Title: 
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

BACKGROUND: Mind-body complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities (e.g., relaxation or meditation) for symptom management have not been well studied in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The purposes of this study were to: 1) determine the prevalence of 5 types of mind-body CAM use, and consideration of use for symptom management; 2) assess characteristics associated with regular mind-body CAM use; and 3) examine whether regular and/or considered mind-body CAM use are associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

Author(s): 
Cotton, Sian
Humenay Roberts, Yvonne
Tsevat, Joel
Britto, Maria T.
Succop, Paul
McGrady, Meghan E.
Yi, Michael S.
Publication Title: 
Adolescence

Infants of mothers with depressive symptoms show developmental delays if symptoms persist over the first 6 months of the infant's life, thus highlighting the importance of identifying those mothers for early intervention. In Study 1, mothers with depressive symptoms (n = 160) and mothers without depressive symptoms (n = 100) and their infants were monitored to identify variables from the first 3 months that predict which mothers would still be symptomatic at 6 months.

Author(s): 
Field, T.
Pickens, J.
Prodromidis, M.
Malphurs, J.
Fox, N.
Bendell, D.
Yando, R.
Schanberg, S.
Kuhn, C.
Publication Title: 
Adolescence

Seventeen aggressive adolescents were randomly assigned to a massage therapy group or a relaxation therapy group to receive 20-minute therapy sessions, twice a week for five weeks. The massaged adolescents had lower anxiety after the first and last sessions. By the end of the study, they also reported feeling less hostile and they were perceived by their parents as being less aggressive. Significant differences were not found for the adolescents who were assigned to the relaxation group.

Author(s): 
Diego, Miguel A.
Field, Tiffany
Hernandez-Reif, Maria
Shaw, Jon A.
Rothe, Eugenio M.
Castellanos, Daniel
Mesner, Linda
Publication Title: 
Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing

This study was aimed to identify the risk factors of aggressive behaviour in adolescents (1318 years), and to describe available intervention strategies. The findings are evaluated on the basis of their implications for nursing practice. Aggressive behaviour in adolescent psychiatric settings is a neglected research area. The consequences of aggressive behaviour on nurses, other patients and the therapeutic environment can be profound.

Author(s): 
Hage, S.
Van Meijel, B.
Fluttert, F.
Berden, G. F. M. G.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Pediatric Health Care: Official Publication of National Association of Pediatric Nurse Associates & Practitioners

This article provides a description of a clinical project that used combined Tai Chi and mindfulness-based stress reduction as an educational program. The 5-week program demonstrated that sustained interest in this material in middle school-aged boys and girls is possible. Statements the boys and girls made in the process suggested that they experienced well-being, calmness, relaxation, improved sleep, less reactivity, increased self-care, self-awareness, and a sense of interconnection or interdependence with nature.

Author(s): 
Wall, Robert B.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of qigong lessons on schoolchildren in terms of their achievements at school, social behavior, and general health. DESIGN: A controlled intervention pilot study was conducted with children in two second-grade classes at an elementary school and in two eighth-grade classes at a high school. SETTING/LOCATION AND INTERVENTION: One class from each school received qigong lessons for 20 minutes at least twice weekly over a period of 6 months, while the control class from the same school received no intervention.

Author(s): 
Witt, Claudia
Becker, Matthias
Bandelin, Karin
Soellner, Renate
Willich, Stefan N.
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