Adolescents, Female

Publication Title: 
Adolescence

This study questions the findings of most research claiming that teenage pregnancies are generally unwanted, unplanned and unintended. It starts with the question of why most sexually active teenagers put themselves at risk of becoming pregnant if they do not desire it. The hypothesis is that sentiments of "love" and "aspirations for marriage" are related to starting sexual activity and subsequent pregnancy. The sample is 123 school-age mothers.

Author(s): 
Scott, J. W.
Publication Title: 
Adolescence

This study investigated the differences in the mother-daughter relationship of pregnant and nonpregnant adolescents. Data were gathered from questionnaires completed by 40 nonpregnant and 20 pregnant adolescents. All respondents were single, secondary school students matched on all demographic variables except grade point average which was significantly lower for the pregnant group. Significant differences in perception of their relationships with their mothers were found on love, attention, and interdependence, with the pregnant group perceiving less of these factors.

Author(s): 
Olson, C. F.
Worobey, J.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Social Psychology

Feelings of romanticism and self-esteem among pregnant adolescents, adolescent mothers, and a control group of nonpregnant, nonparenting adolescents were investigated. The Bachman Self-Esteem Scale (Bachman, O'Malley, & Johnston, 1978) and the Dean Romanticism Scale (Dean, 1961) were distributed to 649 U.S. female adolescents--255 pregnant adolescents, 121 adolescent mothers, and 273 teenagers in the control group.

Author(s): 
Medora, N. P.
Goldstein, A.
von der Hellen, C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Biosocial Science

This paper proposes a causal model of sexual activity among a randomly selected sample of 305 Junio secondary school girls in Zambia. The results indicate that liberal sexual attitudes influence romantic involvement with boys. Emotional involvement is likely to result in sexual activity. Traditional courtship forms are slowly being replaced by modern patterns of courtship behaviour. Policy and programme implications are discussed.

Author(s): 
Pillai, V. K.
Barton, T.
Benefo, K.
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