Adult

Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

Previous research has shown the vast mental and physical health benefits associated with yoga. Yoga practice can be divided into subcategories that include posture-holding exercise (asana), breathing (pranayama, Kriya), and meditation (Sahaj) practice. Studies measuring mental health outcomes have shown decreases in anxiety, and increases in cognitive performance after yoga interventions. Similar studies have also shown cognitive advantages amongst yoga practitioners versus non-practitioners.

Author(s): 
Desai, Radhika
Tailor, Anisha
Bhatt, Tanvi
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine how different levels of yoga involvement are related to different parameters of mental health and illness. DESIGN AND SETTING: A total sample of 455 participants (410 females) were investigated by means of an internet survey. 362 yoga practitioners (327 females) rated their degree of yoga involvement on the Yoga Immersion Scale. A control group was comprised of 93 gymnastics practitioners (83 females).

Author(s): 
Gaiswinkler, L.
Unterrainer, H. F.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVES: To critically evaluate the effectiveness of yoga as a treatment of hypertension. METHODS: Seventeen databases were searched from their inceptions to January 2014. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were included, if they evaluated yoga against any type of control in patients with any form of arterial hypertension. Risk of bias was estimated using the Cochrane criteria. Three independent reviewers performed the selection of studies, data extraction, and quality assessments. RESULTS: Seventeen trials met the inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Posadzki, Paul
Cramer, Holger
Kuzdzal, Adrian
Lee, Myeong Soo
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Epidemiology

As yoga has gained popularity as a therapeutic intervention, its safety has been questioned in the lay press. Thus, this review aimed to systematically assess and meta-analyze the frequency of adverse events in randomized controlled trials of yoga. MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, and IndMED were screened through February 2014. Of 301 identified randomized controlled trials of yoga, 94 (1975-2014; total of 8,430 participants) reported on adverse events.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Ward, Lesley
Saper, Robert
Fishbein, Daniel
Dobos, Gustav
Lauche, Romy
Publication Title: 
[Nihon Koshu Eisei Zasshi] Japanese Journal of Public Health

OBJECTIVES: While several studies on the preventive and therapeutic effects of prenatal yoga (maternity yoga) have been reported in recent years, there has been no systematic review on the effects of prenatal yoga based on randomized controlled trials (RCT). The purpose of this study, therefore, was to systematically review the literature to clarify the effects of prenatal yoga in RCT focusing on the contents of the intervention, the intervention means, and the frequency of practice. METHODS: The literature search was performed using the electronic database, PubMed.

Author(s): 
Kawanishi, Yasuyuki
Hanley, Sharon J. B.
Tabata, Kazuki
Nakagi, Yoshihiko
Ito, Toshihiro
Yoshioka, Eiji
Yoshida, Takahiko
Saijo, Yasuaki
Publication Title: 
PloS One

While yoga seems to be effective in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, the evidence of efficacy in multiple sclerosis remains unclear. The aim of this review was to systematically assess and meta-analyze the available data on efficacy and safety of yoga in patients with multiple sclerosis. Medline/PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PsycINFO, CAM-Quest, CAMbase, and IndMED were searched through March 2014.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Lauche, Romy
Azizi, Hoda
Dobos, Gustav
Langhorst, Jost
Publication Title: 
Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: Official Publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology

BACKGROUND: Although yoga is frequently used by patients with asthma, its efficacy in alleviating asthma remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: To systematically assess and meta-analyze the available data on efficacy and safety of yoga in alleviating asthma. METHODS: MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PsycINFO, CAM-Quest, CAMbase, and IndMED were searched through January 2014. Randomized controlled trials of yoga for patients with asthma were included if they assessed asthma control, symptoms, quality of life, and/or pulmonary function.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Posadzki, Paul
Dobos, Gustav
Langhorst, Jost
Publication Title: 
Journal of Diabetes Research

A growing body of evidence suggests yogic practices may benefit adults with type 2 diabetes (DM2). In this systematic review, we evaluate available evidence from prospective controlled trials regarding the effects of yoga-based programs on specific health outcomes pertinent to DM2 management. To identify qualifying studies, we searched nine databases and scanned bibliographies of relevant review papers and all identified articles.

Author(s): 
Innes, Kim E.
Selfe, Terry Kit
Publication Title: 
Journal of Community Health

The purpose of this study was to identify the perceptions of nurses toward the effectiveness and safety, as well as their recommendations for and personal use of complementary and alternative medical therapies. A, random sample of 1000 nurses throughout the United States were surveyed using a three-wave mailing. About half of the respondents perceived there was conclusive evidence or preponderance of evidence that five therapies were effective: biofeedback, chiropractic, meditation/relaxation, multi-vitamins, and massage therapy.

Author(s): 
Brolinson, P. G.
Price, J. H.
Ditmyer, M.
Reis, D.
Publication Title: 
Wiener Klinische Wochenschrift

It is claimed that regular practice of Transcendental Meditation (TM) improves cognitive function and increases intelligence. This systematic review assesses the evidence from randomised controlled trials for cumulative effects of TM on cognitive function. Searches were made of electronic databases and the collected papers and official websites of the TM organisation. Only randomised controlled trials with objective outcome measures of the cumulative effects of TM on cognitive function were included.

Author(s): 
Canter, Peter H.
Ernst, Edzard

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