Aged, 80 and over

Publication Title: 
Pharmacogenomics

Lifespan experiments of lower organisms and mammals along with recent studies of centenarians are making inroads into delineating genetic factors that determine the ability to achieve exceptional longevity. These models may be helpful for the discovery of both longevity-enabling genes as well as genes associated with increased propensity to develop specific diseases.

Author(s): 
Perls, Thomas
Puca, Annibale
Publication Title: 
Journal of molecular neuroscience: MN

How we age as individuals is no doubt a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Studies of certain populations with optimal environments and health-related behaviors, as well as twin studies, suggest that the average set of genetic variations should facilitate the average person's ability to live to around age 85. Average life expectancies are lower than this because we generally fight survival advantage with bad health habits that can lead to premature aging, chronic illness, and death at a significantly younger age.

Author(s): 
Perls, Thomas
Kunkel, Louis M.
Puca, Annibale A.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry: Official Journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry

OBJECTIVE: A systematic genome survey was initiated to identify loci that affect the likelihood of reaching age 90 with preserved cognition. This communication describes the clinical characterization and comparison of the experimental groups, validation of the experimental method, and results for the Y chromosome. METHODS: The genome survey was conducted at 10 cM resolution for simple sequence tandem repeat polymorphisms (SSTRPs) that identify genes for successful aging by virtue of linkage disequilibrium.

Author(s): 
Zubenko, George S.
Stiffler, J. Scott
Hughes, Hugh B.
Fatigati, Mario J.
Zubenko, Wendy N.
Publication Title: 
The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

BACKGROUND: Families of centenarians have high levels of plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, which may have neurological as well as cardiovascular protective effects during aging. Because plasma HDL level declines progressively with aging, we examined whether centenarians with higher plasma HDL levels have better cognitive function.

Author(s): 
Atzmon, Gil
Gabriely, Ilan
Greiner, William
Davidson, Deborah
Schechter, Clyde
Barzilai, Nir
Publication Title: 
The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

BACKGROUND: The compression of morbidity hypothesis predicts that, in order to achieve their extreme old age, centenarians markedly delay or even escape diseases that would otherwise be lethal at younger ages. Phenotypic studies have not adequately characterized the prevalence and timing of age-related illnesses among those who achieve exceptional old age. Thus, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of centenarians to explore the timing of such diseases among centenarians. METHODS: Health history questionnaires were completed by 424 centenarians (aged 97-119 years) or their proxies.

Author(s): 
Evert, Jessica
Lawler, Elizabeth
Bogan, Hazel
Perls, Thomas
Publication Title: 
The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

BACKGROUND: A significant component of the ability to survive to exceptional old age may be familial. This study assessed the prevalence of age-related diseases in the offspring of centenarians. METHODS: The health histories of centenarian offspring (n=177) and controls (n=166) were assessed from 1997-2000 using a cross-sectional study design. The offspring of 192 centenarian subjects enrolled in the nationwide New England Centenarian Study were recruited and enrolled.

Author(s): 
Terry, Dellara F.
Wilcox, Marsha
McCormick, Maegan A.
Lawler, Elizabeth
Perls, Thomas T.
Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

Centenarians exist at the extreme of life expectancy and are rare. A number of pedigree and molecular genetic studies indicate that a significant component of exceptional longevity is genetically influenced. Furthermore, the recent discovery of a genetic locus on chromosome 4 indicates the powerful potential of studying centenarians for genetic factors that significantly modulate aging and susceptibility to age-related diseases. These studies include siblings and children of centenarians.

Author(s): 
Perls, Thomas
Terry, Dellara
Publication Title: 
Recenti Progressi in Medicina

The 20th century will be remembered for its technological and scientific discoveries and for the exceptional changes in the demographic structure brought about by these and the improved economic and social conditions; in fact, the reduction in the birth rate and a fall in the death rate have caused an increase in the population of the elderly.

Author(s): 
Cicconetti, Paolo
Riolo, Noemi
Ettorre, Evaristo
Costarella, Marianna
Priami, Carolina
Marigliano, Vincenzo
Publication Title: 
JAMA: the journal of the American Medical Association

CONTEXT: Individuals with exceptional longevity have a lower incidence and/or significant delay in the onset of age-related disease, and their family members may inherit biological factors that modulate aging processes and disease susceptibility. OBJECTIVE: To identify specific biological and genetic factors that are associated with or reliably define a human longevity phenotype.

Author(s): 
Barzilai, Nir
Atzmon, Gil
Schechter, Clyde
Schaefer, Ernst J.
Cupples, Adrienne L.
Lipton, Richard
Cheng, Suzanne
Shuldiner, Alan R.
Publication Title: 
Neurology

OBJECTIVE: To examine the relative risk and population attributable risk (PAR) of death with dementia of varying type and severity and other risk factors in a population of exceptional longevity. METHODS: Deaths were monitored over 5 years using vital statistics records and newspaper obituaries in 355 individuals with prevalent dementia and 4,328 without in Cache County, UT. Mean age was 83.3 (SD 7.0) years with dementia and 73.7 (SD 6.8) years without. History of coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes, and other life-shortening illness was ascertained from interviews.

Author(s): 
Tschanz, J. T.
Corcoran, C.
Skoog, I.
Khachaturian, A. S.
Herrick, J.
Hayden, K. M.
Welsh-Bohmer, K. A.
Calvert, T.
Norton, M. C.
Zandi, P.
Breitner, J. C. S.
Cache County Study Group

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