Analgesics

Publication Title: 
Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.)

OBJECTIVE: This manuscript reviews peer-reviewed literature published from 2010-2012 relevant to the management of chronic pain in the primary care setting. DESIGN: Narrative review of peer-reviewed literature. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, PubMed, and reference lists and queried expert contacts for English-language studies related to the management of chronic noncancer pain in adult patients in primary care settings.

Author(s): 
Frank, Joseph W.
Bair, Matthew J.
Becker, William C.
Krebs, Erin E.
Liebschutz, Jane M.
Alford, Daniel P.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Emergency Medicine

BACKGROUND: A total of 2.7 million patients present to US emergency departments annually for management of low back pain (LBP). Despite optimal medical therapy, more than 50% remain functionally impaired 3 months later. We performed a systematic review to address the following question: Among patients with nonchronic LBP, does spinal manipulation, massage, exercise, or yoga, when combined with standard medical therapy, improve pain and functional outcomes more than standard medical therapy alone?

Author(s): 
Rothberg, Samantha
Friedman, Benjamin W.
Publication Title: 
Annals of Internal Medicine

Description: The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline to present the evidence and provide clinical recommendations on noninvasive treatment of low back pain. Methods: Using the ACP grading system, the committee based these recommendations on a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews published through April 2015 on noninvasive pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments for low back pain. Updated searches were performed through November 2016.

Author(s): 
Qaseem, Amir
Wilt, Timothy J.
McLean, Robert M.
Forciea, Mary Ann
Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians
Publication Title: 
Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Pain is a significant concern in people with chronic wounds. A systematized approach is recommended for the management of wound-associated pain with the objectives to address pain relief, increase function, and restore overall quality of life. RECENT FINDINGS: Combinations of pharmacological agents are often recommended based on varying degree of pain severity, coexisting nociceptive and neuropathic pain, and chronic inflammation related to wound-associated pain.

Author(s): 
Woo, Kevin Y.
Abbott, Laura K.
Librach, Lawrence
Publication Title: 
Annals of Internal Medicine

Description: The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline to present the evidence and provide clinical recommendations on noninvasive treatment of low back pain. Methods: Using the ACP grading system, the committee based these recommendations on a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews published through April 2015 on noninvasive pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments for low back pain. Updated searches were performed through November 2016.

Author(s): 
Qaseem, Amir
Wilt, Timothy J.
McLean, Robert M.
Forciea, Mary Ann
Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians
Publication Title: 
Anesthesia and Analgesia

BACKGROUND: Suggestive interventions such as hypnosis and therapeutic suggestions are frequently used to alleviate surgical side effects; however, the effectiveness of therapeutic suggestion intervention has not yet been systematically evaluated.

Author(s): 
Kekecs, Zoltán
Nagy, Tamás
Varga, Katalin
Publication Title: 
Annales Francaises D'anesthesie Et De Reanimation

Analgesia and hypnosis are two separate entities and should result in distinct assessment and management for patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). Those patients are exposed to moderate-severe pain and they are likely to remember pain as one bothersome experience. Any cause of patient discomfort is sought with the priority given to pain and adequate analgesia. Assessing pain must rely upon the use of clinical scoring systems, although these instruments are still underused in ICU.

Author(s): 
Payen, J.-F.
Chanques, G.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: To determine the degree and duration of pain relief provided by specific pain treatments used by individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) who have chronic pain. DESIGN: Postal survey. SETTING: Community. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were 117 individuals who had traumatic SCI, were 18 years of age or older, and reported a chronic pain problem. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Questions assessing current or past use of 26 different pain treatments, the amount of relief each treatment provided, and the length of time that any pain relief usually lasts.

Author(s): 
Cardenas, Diana D.
Jensen, Mark P.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

Clinical hypnosis in cancer settings provides symptom reduction (pain and anxiety) and empowers patients to take an active role in their treatments and procedures. The goal of this paper is to systematically and critically review evidence on the effectiveness of hypnotherapy for emesis, analgesia, and anxiolysis in acute pain, specifically in procedures with an emphasis on the period from 1999 to 2006. Further, it aims to provide a theoretical rationale for the use of hypnosis with cancer populations in the whole spectrum of illness/treatment trajectory in several clinical contexts.

Author(s): 
Néron, Sylvain
Stephenson, Randolph
Publication Title: 
British Journal of Anaesthesia

BACKGROUND: In view of widespread claims of efficacy, we examined the evidence regarding the effects of hypnosis for pain relief during childbirth. METHODS: Medline, Embase, Pubmed, and the Cochrane library 2004.1 were searched for clinical trials where hypnosis during pregnancy and childbirth was compared with a non-hypnosis intervention, no treatment or placebo. Reference lists from retrieved papers and hypnotherapy texts were also examined. There were no language restrictions.

Author(s): 
Cyna, A. M.
McAuliffe, G. L.
Andrew, M. I.

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