Anatomy

Publication Title: 
Clinical Anatomy (New York, N.Y.)

It is remarkable that the famous ÈcorchÈs of HonorÈ Fragonard have survived the centuries to reach us today. Studies carried out by several teams have established details of the technique used by Fragonard that help to explain their longevity. The injection of the vessels was achieved by means of a mixture of mutton tallow and pine resin diluted in essence of turpentine and essential oils. This gave Fragonard a very high success rate. Above all, he did not add pigments to his mixture while injecting the veins, and this facilitated the procedure.

Author(s): 
Degueurce, Christophe
vo Duy, Sung
Bleton, Jean
Hugon, Paulette
Cadot, Laure
Tchapla, Alain
Adds, Philip
Publication Title: 
Annals of Anatomy = Anatomischer Anzeiger: Official Organ of the Anatomische Gesellschaft

BACKGROUND: In recent years the Netherlands has witnessed a steep increase in the number of bodies donated for medical research and training. To explore this upward trend and motives for donation, a survey was conducted among registered body donors in the database of the Department of Anatomy at the University Medical Center of Groningen (UMCG). METHODS: In November 2008, postal questionnaires were sent to 996 people enrolled at the UMCG body donor database. The present study focuses on motives for donation and social background characteristics of the body donors.

Author(s): 
Bolt, Sophie
Venbrux, Eric
Eisinga, Rob
Kuks, Jan B. M.
Veening, Jan G.
Gerrits, Peter O.
Publication Title: 
Anatomical Sciences Education

Many anatomy programs that incorporate dissection of donated human bodies hold memorial ceremonies of gratitude towards body donors. The content of these ceremonies may include learners' reflections on mortality, respect, altruism, and personal growth told through various humanities modalities. The task of planning is usually student- and faculty-led with participation from other health care students. Objective information on current memorial ceremonies for body donors in anatomy programs in the United States appears to be lacking.

Author(s): 
Jones, Trahern W.
Lachman, Nirusha
Pawlina, Wojciech
Publication Title: 
Clinical Anatomy (New York, N.Y.)

Body donor programs rely on the generosity and trust of the public to facilitate the provision of cadaver resources for anatomical education and research. The uptake and adoption of emerging technologies, including those allowing the acquisition and distribution of images, are becoming more widespread, including within anatomical science education. Images of cadavers are useful for research and education, and their supply and distribution have commercial potential for textbooks and online education.

Author(s): 
Cornwall, Jon
Callahan, David
Wee, Richman
Publication Title: 
Anatomical Sciences Education

Increasing emphasis on leadership in medical education has created a need for developing accurate evaluations of team leaders. Our study aimed to compare the accuracy of self- and peer evaluation of student leaders in the first-year Human Structure block (integrated gross anatomy, embryology, and radiology). Forty-nine first-year medical students at Mayo Medical School were assigned to learning teams of three or four members. Teams worked together on daily laboratory dissection, clinical projects, embryology presentations, and daily group quizzes.

Author(s): 
Chen, Laura P.
Gregory, Jeremy K.
Camp, Christopher L.
Juskewitch, Justin E.
Pawlina, Wojciech
Lachman, Nirusha
Publication Title: 
Anatomical Sciences Education

By design or default, anatomy educators are often responsible for introducing students to medical professionalism. Although much has been said about the role of anatomical education, there are no published reports suggesting how to measure change. This study investigated what professionalism attitudes, if any, change during a gross anatomy course. Additionally, the influence of four dichotomous variables related to student identity and preparation for medical school were analyzed for their effect on professionalism attitudes.

Author(s): 
Pearson, William G.
Hoagland, Todd M.
Publication Title: 
Anatomical Sciences Education

Professionalism is a core competency of medical training that requires students to develop the skills of providing and receiving feedback. Our study evaluated the effectiveness of delivering feedback in a group setting compared with an individual setting. The first-year class of Mayo medical students (n = 49) enrolled in gross anatomy (in dissection teams), completed weekly anonymous evaluations of themselves and their teammates regarding seven aspects of professionalism (altruism, compassion, respect, honesty/integrity, responsibility, commitment to excellence, and self-reflection).

Author(s): 
Camp, Christopher L.
Gregory, Jeremy K.
Lachman, Nirusha
Chen, Laura P.
Juskewitch, Justin E.
Pawlina, Wojciech
Publication Title: 
Anatomical Sciences Education

The psychosocial impact of human dissection on the lives of medical and health science students has been noted. To assess the impact of the dissection room experience on one's willingness to become a whole body and organ donor, the attitudes of 1,350 students and professionals from the medical, health, and non-health related disciplines to body and organ donation were studied. The participants were broken into categories according to degree of exposure to human dissection.

Author(s): 
Anyanwu, Emeka G.
Obikili, Emmanuel N.
Agu, Augustine U.
Publication Title: 
Anatomical Sciences Education

Many anatomy programs that incorporate dissection of donated human bodies hold memorial ceremonies of gratitude towards body donors. The content of these ceremonies may include learners' reflections on mortality, respect, altruism, and personal growth told through various humanities modalities. The task of planning is usually student- and faculty-led with participation from other health care students. Objective information on current memorial ceremonies for body donors in anatomy programs in the United States appears to be lacking.

Author(s): 
Jones, Trahern W.
Lachman, Nirusha
Pawlina, Wojciech
Publication Title: 
Clinical Anatomy (New York, N.Y.)

Teaching and research facilities often use cadaveric material alongside animal tissues, although there appear to be differences in the way we handle, treat, and dispose of human cadaveric material compared to animal tissue. This study sought to analyze cultural and ethical considerations and provides policy recommendations on the use of animal tissues alongside human tissue. The status of human and animal remains and the respect because of human and animal tissues were compared and analyzed from ethical, legal, and cultural perspectives.

Author(s): 
Kaw, Anu
Jones, D. Gareth
Zhang, Ming

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