Anemia, Sickle Cell

Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: Sickle cell disease causes chronic haemolytic anaemia, dactylitis, and painful acute crises, and increases the risk of stroke, organ damage, bacterial infections, and complications of blood transfusion. In sub-Saharan Africa, up to a third of adults are carriers of the defective sickle cell gene, and 1-2% of babies are born with the disease.

Author(s): 
Meremikwu, Martin M.
Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: Sickle cell disease causes chronic haemolytic anaemia, dactylitis, and painful acute crises, and increases the risk of stroke, organ damage, bacterial infections, and complications of blood transfusion. In sub-Saharan Africa, up to a third of adults are carriers of the defective sickle cell gene, and 1-2% of babies are born with the disease.

Author(s): 
Meremikwu, Martin M.
Publication Title: 
Polski Merkuriusz Lekarski: Organ Polskiego Towarzystwa Lekarskiego

During human development, the switch from foetal gamma- to adult beta-globin on chromosome 11p is not complete resulting in the residual gamma-globin expression in a modest subpopulation of erythrocytes termed "F-cells". Genetic determinants that are responsible for higher level of Hb F include various mutations within the beta-globin gene cluster as well as singular nucleotide polymorphisms in other loci associated with Hb F quantitative trait, and also epigenetic mechanisms. All these molecular conditions may drive to hereditary persistence of foetal haemoglobin (HPFH).

Author(s): 
Musielak, Ma?gorzata
Publication Title: 
Pediatrics

Recurrent painful vaso-occlusive crises often represent sources of frustration and debilitation to those afflicted with sickle cell disease. We present two adolescents with sickle cell disease who have been able to gain control over the frequency and intensity of these crises by utilizing self-hypnosis. We feel that the utilization of similar technique(s) may allow many ill children and adolescents to obtain mastery over abnormal physiologic processes concomitant with their particular disease status.

Author(s): 
Zeltzer, L.
Dash, J.
Holland, J. P.
Publication Title: 
Biofeedback and Self-Regulation

Fifteen patients with a history of painful episodes of sickle cell disease were given training in progressive relaxation, thermal biofeedback, cognitive strategies, and self-hypnosis to help them develop self-management skills to relieve pain. Results show a 38.5% reduction in the number of emergency room visits, a 31% reduction in the number of hospitalizations, and a 50% reduction in the inpatient stay during the 6 months since the beginning of therapy compared to 6 months prior to therapy. Analgesic intake was reduced by 29% for those who were using it regularly.

Author(s): 
Thomas, J. E.
Koshy, M.
Patterson, L.
Dorn, L.
Thomas, K.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Psychosomatics: Official Publication of the International Psychosomatics Institute

An interdisciplinary program with the goal of teaching self-regulation and minimizing excessive narcotic use in the management of vaso-occlusive pain (V-O) in pediatric sickle cell anemia patients is described. A small group of patients do not respond well to any of our outpatients or inpatients medical regimens, leading us to suspect that psychological factors are influencing pain reports. We outline our multi-faceted assessment approach to evaluating such psychological factors, which includes a pain flow sheet, symptom check list, and a psychophysiologic profile.

Author(s): 
Hall, H.
Chiarucci, K.
Berman, B.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

A cohort of patients with sickle cell disease, consisting of children, adolescents, and adults, who reported experiencing three or more episodes of vaso-occlusive pain the preceding year, were enrolled in a prospective two-period treatment protocol. Following a 4-month conventional treatment baseline phase, a supplemental cognitive-behavioral pain management program that centered on self-hypnosis was implemented over the next 18 months.

Author(s): 
Dinges, D. F.
Whitehouse, W. G.
Orne, E. C.
Bloom, P. B.
Carlin, M. M.
Bauer, N. K.
Gillen, K. A.
Shapiro, B. S.
Ohene-Frempong, K.
Dampier, C.
Orne, M. T.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the American Board of Family Practice / American Board of Family Practice

BACKGROUND: Patients with sickle cell disease cope with their disease in various ways, such as psychological counseling, hypnosis, medication, and prayer. Spirituality is a coping mechanism in a variety of diseases. This study evaluates the role of spirituality in patients coping with the pain of sickle cell disease. METHODS: Seventy-one patients from the Georgia Sickle Cell Clinic completed a questionnaire addressing their ability to cope with the pain of sickle cell disease and their degree of spirituality. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used.

Author(s): 
Cooper-Effa, M.
Blount, W.
Kaslow, N.
Rothenberg, R.
Eckman, J.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

This article reviews controlled prospective trials of hypnosis for the treatment of chronic pain. Thirteen studies, excluding studies of headaches, were identified that compared outcomes from hypnosis for the treatment of chronic pain to either baseline data or a control condition. The findings indicate that hypnosis interventions consistently produce significant decreases in pain associated with a variety of chronic-pain problems. Also, hypnosis was generally found to be more effective than nonhypnotic interventions such as attention, physical therapy, and education.

Author(s): 
Elkins, Gary
Jensen, Mark P.
Patterson, David R.
Publication Title: 
Explore (New York, N.Y.)
Author(s): 
Glickman-Simon, Richard
Savasta, Stephanie

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