Anthropology, Cultural

Publication Title: 
Health Care for Women International

In this ethnographic study, I examine personal, kinship, and social obligations and the role of women in the traditional Thai family. Under what circumstances do women take on the responsibility to care or not care, and how do they cope with the disease and care when they are also infected? Fifteen women who were afflicted or affected by HIV/AIDS participated in in-depth interviews and participant observations. Analysis employed mainly qualitative methods following Spradley.

Author(s): 
Songwathana, P.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health / Center for Minority Public Health

The breast cancer experiences of Punjabi immigrant women, who represent the most populace group of South Asians in Canada, need to be understood in order to inform culturally appropriate cancer services. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore women's stories of breast cancer in order to uncover how they made sense of their experiences. Interviews with twelve Punjabi immigrant women who had breast cancer within the last 8 years were available for this study.

Author(s): 
Howard, A. Fuchsia
Bottorff, Joan L.
Balneaves, Lynda G.
Grewal, Sukhdev K.
Publication Title: 
Medical Anthropology Quarterly

Various theories exist for the ways in which social and material disparities are incorporated within human bodies and then expressed as health outcomes with uneven distributions. From a political economy perspective, one pathway involves processes of social exclusion that take place on articulating local and global fields of power. This study explores such situated processes as they produce and perpetuate embodied inequality at childbirth in the Kilombero Valley of South-Central Tanzania.

Author(s): 
Spangler, Sydney A.
Publication Title: 
Research and Theory for Nursing Practice

In this ethnographic study, a womanist framework was used to investigate the process of recovery from domestic violence. A purposive sample of African American women (N = 21) was interviewed to gain understanding of their recovery process. Survivorship-thriving was the overarching process.

Author(s): 
Taylor, Janette Y.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Nursing Scholarship: An Official Publication of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing / Sigma Theta Tau

PURPOSE: To describe culturally embedded values that implicitly guide Filipino Canadian patients' interactions with Canadian nurses and are integral to nurse-patient relationships. DESIGN AND METHODS: A focused ethnography was conducted, with a purposive sample of 23 Filipino-Canadians who received care in Canadian hospitals. Data consisted of interviews, field notes, and diary.

Author(s): 
Pasco, Alberta Catherine Y.
Morse, Janice M.
Olson, Joanne K.
Publication Title: 
Tropical medicine & international health: TM & IH

Among women in South Asia, the complaint of vaginal discharge (often called leukorrhea) is extraordinarily common. From a biomedical perspective, this symptom suggests that reproductive tract infection (RTI) is prevalent in the subcontinent; however, several recent studies provide evidence that the prevalence of RTI is relatively low. Women who do not have RTI frequently report the symptom of vaginal discharge. An anthropological perspective on the cultural meanings of leukorrhea can shed light on this puzzling phenomenon.

Author(s): 
Trollope-Kumar, K.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine. Medical Anthropology
Author(s): 
Nichter, M.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

In classical Ayurvedic medicine, the jungle is the dry land of the Punjab and the Delhi Doab, an open vegetation of thorny shrubs. The polarity of dry lands and wet lands framed not only the whole Ayurvedic materia medica, but also the more general conception of a cosmic physiology governed by Agni (the sun) and Soma (the dispenser of the rain). Clearing the land and draining the body were two aspects of one and the same art of managing the transactions of all sorts of vital fluids, saps, juices, savors and humors.

Author(s): 
Zimmermann, F.
Publication Title: 
Tropical medicine & international health: TM & IH

Among women in South Asia, the complaint of vaginal discharge (often called leukorrhea) is extraordinarily common. From a biomedical perspective, this symptom suggests that reproductive tract infection (RTI) is prevalent in the subcontinent; however, several recent studies provide evidence that the prevalence of RTI is relatively low. Women who do not have RTI frequently report the symptom of vaginal discharge. An anthropological perspective on the cultural meanings of leukorrhea can shed light on this puzzling phenomenon.

Author(s): 
Trollope-Kumar, K.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

Anthropology and other social sciences have not given detailed attention to cultural constructions of arthritic disorders and their place in traditional medical systems. Humoral medicine and its numerous crosscultural variants offer an important perspective on the conceptualization and treatment of arthritis. The present paper provides a descriptive account of rheumatic disorders in India's Ayurvedic and Unani medical traditions. Data derive from anthropological fieldwork in the New Delhi metropolitan area and from Ayurvedic and Unani texts and secondary sources.

Author(s): 
Pugh, Judy F.

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