Anticholesteremic Agents

Publication Title: 
Romanian Journal of Internal Medicine = Revue Roumaine De MÈdecine Interne

Decreased high density lipoproteins (HDL) plasma levels are a recognized independent risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Attempts were therefore initiated to pharmacologically raise plasma HDL cholesterol, and the most impressive increase was obtained by inhibiting cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) by means of the synthetic compound torcetrapib. Clinical trials were however disappointing, as torcetrapib increased mortality and did not reduce the progression of atherosclerosis.

Author(s): 
Cucuianu, M.
Bruda?c?, Ioana
Publication Title: 
Therapeutische Umschau. Revue ThÈrapeutique

Familial forms of isolated hypercholesterolemia are inherited autosomal-dominantly and are caused by defects of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor protein or its ligand, the apolipoprotein B-100, the exclusive apolipoprotein moiety of the LDL particles. Mutations at the LDL receptor gene locus (more than 150 different mutations have been described up to now) lead to familial hypercholesterolemia (FH); the only mutation at the apolipoprotein B-100 gene locus described in detail so far leads to the so-called familial defective apolipoprotein B-100 (FDB).

Author(s): 
Miserez, A. R.
Keller, U.
Publication Title: 
Postgraduate Medicine

Advances in treatment of elevated cholesterol levels and recent documentation of efficacy and safety in clinical trials justify expanded use of cholesterol-lowering therapy in clinical practice. Patients with CHD or other forms of clinical atherosclerotic disease can benefit from aggressive cholesterol management. Maximal dietary modification, weight control, and physical activity are valuable adjuncts to drug therapy in secondary prevention. Recent studies have shown that appropriate use of cholesterol-lowering drugs is cost-effective and efficacious in patients with CHD.

Author(s): 
Grundy, S. M.
Publication Title: 
Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy / Sponsored by the International Society of Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy

Hypertension is often associated with other risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including elevated levels of cholesterol, and casual systolic hypertension is a very prevalent finding in the elderly (50% of women over the age of 80 have casual systolic blood pressures > or = 160 mmHg). Total cholesterol levels steadily increase with age from 20 to 65, following which they decrease slightly in men and tend to plateau in women. Elevated cholesterol levels are not uncommon in the elderly (61% of women aged between 65 and 74 have total cholesterol levels over 6.2 mmol/L [240 mg/dL]).

Author(s): 
Beckett, N.
Nunes, M.
Bulpitt, C.
Publication Title: 
Romanian Journal of Internal Medicine = Revue Roumaine De MÈdecine Interne

Decreased high density lipoproteins (HDL) plasma levels are a recognized independent risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Attempts were therefore initiated to pharmacologically raise plasma HDL cholesterol, and the most impressive increase was obtained by inhibiting cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) by means of the synthetic compound torcetrapib. Clinical trials were however disappointing, as torcetrapib increased mortality and did not reduce the progression of atherosclerosis.

Author(s): 
Cucuianu, M.
Bruda?c?, Ioana
Publication Title: 
Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Boswellia serrata, Linn F (Burseraceae) is commonly used in Indian system of medicine (Ayurvedic) as an anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-arthritic and anti-proliferative agent. This study was planned to investigate the water-soluble fraction of the oleoresin gum of Boswellia serrata (BS extract) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced nitric oxide (NO) production by macrophages under in vivo and in vitro conditions. In the previous condition, rats were fed on atherogenic diet (2.5% cholesterol, 1% cholic acid, 15.7 % saturated fat) along with the BS extract for 90 days.

Author(s): 
Pandey, Ravi S.
Singh, Birendra K.
Tripathi, Yamini B.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

BACKGROUND: Guggul, herbal extract from resin of the Commiphora mukul tree, is widely used in Asia as a cholesterol-lowering agent based on Indian Ayurvedic medicine. Its popularity for this use is increasing in the US and Western Europe. Guggulsterones, the presumed bioactive compounds of guggul, may antagonise two nuclear hormone receptors involved in cholesterol metabolism, which is a possible explanation for hypolipidemic effects of these extracts. However, publications of efficacy data on the use of guggul extracts in Western populations are scarce.

Author(s): 
Nohr, Lise Anett
Rasmussen, Lars Bjørn
Straand, Jørund
Publication Title: 
Journal of Aging and Health

OBJECTIVE: This review focuses on a comprehensive, sophisticated system of natural medicine that appears to hold promise for prevention of chronic diseases and disabilities, loss of independence, suffering, and health care costs often associated with "usual" aging.

Author(s): 
Schneider, Robert H.
Alexander, Charles N.
Salerno, John W.
Robinson, Donald K.
Fields, Jeremy Z.
Nidich, Sanford I.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Research

Liver X receptors function as central transcriptional regulators for lipid homeostasis, for which agonists have been developed as potential drugs for treatment of cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndromes. Because dysregulation of lipid metabolism has been implicated in sex hormone-dependent cancers, we investigated the effect of liver X receptor agonists on prostate and breast cancer cell proliferation.

Author(s): 
Fukuchi, Junichi
Kokontis, John M.
Hiipakka, Richard A.
Chuu, Chih-Pin
Liao, Shutsung
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: It is now accepted that inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis is effective in the primary and secondary prevention of heart disease. However, the perceived side-effects on muscle and liver reduce the general acceptance of statin drug therapy as well as compliance over the long term, which is necessary for prevention efforts to be successful. Chinese red yeast rice (CRYR) is a supplement containing lovastatin (monacolin K), eight other monacolins, pigments, tannins, and other phytochemicals.

Author(s): 
Li, Zhaoping
Seeram, Navindra P.
Lee, Rupo
Thames, Gail
Minutti, Chayo
Wang, He-Jing
Heber, David

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Anticholesteremic Agents