Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic

Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Enuresis (bedwetting) is a socially disruptive and stressful condition which affects around 15-20% of five year olds, and up to 2% of young adults. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of tricyclic and related drugs on nocturnal enuresis in children, and to compare them with other interventions. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group trials register (December 2002) and the reference lists of relevant articles including two previously published versions of this review. Date of the most recent searches: December 2002.

Author(s): 
Glazener, C. M. A.
Evans, J. H. C.
Peto, R. E.
Publication Title: 
Family Practice

BACKGROUND: A number of different therapies have been used for postherpetic neuralgia. We decided to conduct a systematic review of existing randomized controlled trials. OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of available therapies for relieving the pain of established postherpetic neuralgia. METHODS: We performed a systematic review, including meta-analysis, of existing randomized controlled trials. Eleven published trials and one unpublished trial were identified which met the inclusion criteria and were included in the current review.

Author(s): 
Volmink, J.
Lancaster, T.
Gray, S.
Silagy, C.
Publication Title: 
PLoS medicine

BACKGROUND: Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is a complication of acute herpes zoster, which is emerging as a preferred clinical trial model for chronic neuropathic pain. Although there are published meta-analyses of analgesic therapy in PHN, and neuropathic pain in general, the evidence base has been substantially enhanced by the recent publication of several major trials. Therefore, we have conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis for both efficacy and adverse events of analgesic therapy for PHN.

Author(s): 
Hempenstall, Kathleen
Nurmikko, Turo J.
Johnson, Robert W.
A'Hern, Roger P.
Rice, Andrew S. C.
Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: Nocturnal enuresis affects 15-20% of 5-year-old children, 5% of 10 year-old-children and 1-2% of people aged 15 years and over. Without treatment, 15% of affected children will become dry each year. Nocturnal enuresis is not diagnosed in children younger than 5 years, and treatment may be inappropriate for children younger than 7 years. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of interventions for relief of symptoms?

Author(s): 
Kiddoo, Darcie
Publication Title: 
PLoS medicine

BACKGROUND: Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is a complication of acute herpes zoster, which is emerging as a preferred clinical trial model for chronic neuropathic pain. Although there are published meta-analyses of analgesic therapy in PHN, and neuropathic pain in general, the evidence base has been substantially enhanced by the recent publication of several major trials. Therefore, we have conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis for both efficacy and adverse events of analgesic therapy for PHN.

Author(s): 
Hempenstall, Kathleen
Nurmikko, Turo J.
Johnson, Robert W.
A'Hern, Roger P.
Rice, Andrew S. C.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Nocturnal enuresis (bedwetting) is a socially disruptive and stressful condition which affects around 15% to 20% of five year olds and up to 2% of adults. Although there is a high rate of spontaneous remission, the social, emotional and psychological costs can be great. Behavioural interventions for treating bedwetting are defined as interventions that require a behaviour or action by the child which promotes night dryness and includes strategies which reward that behaviour.

Author(s): 
Caldwell, Patrina H. Y.
Nankivell, Gail
Sureshkumar, Premala
Publication Title: 
Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry

5-HT2A receptor density in prefrontal cortex was associated with depression and suicide. 5-HT2A receptor gene polymorphism rs6313 was associated with 5-HT2A receptor binding potential, with the ability of individuals to use environmental support in order to prevent depression, and with sleep improvement after antidepressant treatment with mirtazapine. Studies on response to antidepressant drugs gave inconsistent results.

Author(s): 
Benedetti, Francesco
Barbini, Barbara
Bernasconi, Alessandro
Fulgosi, Mara Cigala
Colombo, Cristina
Dallaspezia, Sara
Gavinelli, Chiara
Marino, Elena
Pirovano, Adele
Radaelli, Daniele
Smeraldi, Enrico
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Psychiatry

OBJECTIVE: The authors compared the effectiveness of fluoxetine and desipramine treatment in a prospective double-blind pharmacogenetics study in first-generation Mexican Americans and examined the role of whole-exome functional gene variations in the patients' antidepressant response. METHOD: A total of 232 Mexican Americans who met DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder were randomly assigned to receive 8 weeks of double-blind treatment with desipramine (50-200 mg/day) or fluoxetine (10-40 mg/day) after a 1-week placebo lead-in period.

Author(s): 
Wong, Ma-Li
Dong, Chuanhui
Flores, Deborah L.
Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika
Bornstein, Stefan
Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio
Licinio, Julio
Publication Title: 
Journal of Affective Disorders

The present study aimed at investigating the possible changes of some features of loving relationships during long-term treatment of depression with both selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclics (TCAs), by means of a specifically designed test, the so-called "Sex, Attachment, Love" (SALT) questionnaire.

Author(s): 
Marazziti, Donatella
Akiskal, Hagop S.
Udo, Mieko
Picchetti, Michela
Baroni, Stefano
Massimetti, Gabriele
Albanese, Francesco
Dell'Osso, Liliana
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics

Pretreatment of rats with tricyclic antidepressants, imipramine, desipramine, amitriptyline and nortriptyline, at two doses (5 and 25 mg/kg) 20 minutes before administration of barbiturate markedly reduced the latent period of the response to barbital and prolonged the sleeping time induced by pentobarbital (PB) and barbital. The effects were dose-dependent. The prolonged sleeping time produced by PB was associated with decreases in the rates of disappearance of PB from the brain and plasma.

Author(s): 
Liu, S. J.
Huang, C. L.
Waters, I. W.

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