Anxiety

Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of yoga nidra on psychological problems in women with menstrual disorders. METHODS: A search was conducted using CINAHL, the Cochrane library, Embase, PsycINFO, and PubMed electronic databases, and using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA), to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in any language up to and including July 2016, which reported the psychological effects of yoga nidra in women with menstrual disorders. RESULTS: Two potential trials were identified and both were included in the review.

Author(s): 
Kim, Sang-Dol
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Occupational Therapy: Official Publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association

This article is the first part of a systematic review of evidence for the effectiveness of cancer rehabilitation interventions within the scope of occupational therapy that address the activity and participation needs of adult cancer survivors. This article focuses on the importance of physical activity and symptom management. Strong evidence supports the use of exercise for cancer-related fatigue and indicates that lymphedema is not exacerbated by exercise.

Author(s): 
Hunter, Elizabeth G.
Gibson, Robert W.
Arbesman, Marian
D'Amico, Mariana
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

BACKGROUND: There is considerable literature on managing depression, burden and psychological morbidity in caregivers of people with dementia (CG). Anxiety has been a relatively neglected outcome measure but may require specific interventions. OBJECTIVE: To synthesise evidence regarding interventions that reduce anxiety in CGs. METHODS: Twenty-four studies met our inclusion criteria. We rated the methodology of studies, and awarded grades of recommendation (GR) for each type of intervention according to Centre for Evidence Based Medicine guidelines, from A (highest level of evidence) to D.

Author(s): 
Cooper, Claudia
Balamurali, T. B. S.
Selwood, Amber
Livingston, Gill
Publication Title: 
Mindfulness

Presenting with common mental health difficulties, particularly depression and anxiety, there is also preliminary evidence that mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) including mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) and integrated mindfulness yoga practices may also be effective in reducing common mental health difficulties during pregnancy. We systematically reviewed and synthesized the current literature on the effectiveness of MBIs in reducing severity of perinatal anxiety and depression.

Author(s): 
Shi, Zhenrong
MacBeth, Angus
Publication Title: 
CA: a cancer journal for clinicians

Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited.

Author(s): 
Greenlee, Heather
DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J.
Balneaves, Lynda G.
Carlson, Linda E.
Cohen, Misha R.
Deng, Gary
Johnson, Jillian A.
Mumber, Matthew
Seely, Dugald
Zick, Suzanna M.
Boyce, Lindsay M.
Tripathy, Debu
Publication Title: 
Oncology Nursing Forum

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise interventions on overall health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its domains among adults scheduled to, or actively undergoing, cancer treatment. DATA SOURCES: 11 electronic databases were searched through November 2011. In addition, the authors searched PubMed's related article feature, trial registries, and reference lists of included trials and related reviews. DATA SYNTHESIS: 56 trials with 4,826 participants met the inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Mishra, Shiraz I.
Scherer, Roberta W.
Snyder, Claire
Geigle, Paula
Gotay, Carolyn
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the cancer most frequently diagnosed in women worldwide. Even though survival rates are continually increasing, breast cancer is often associated with long-term psychological distress, chronic pain, fatigue and impaired quality of life. Yoga comprises advice for an ethical lifestyle, spiritual practice, physical activity, breathing exercises and meditation. It is a complementary therapy that is commonly recommended for breast cancer-related impairments and has been shown to improve physical and mental health in people with different cancer types.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Lauche, Romy
Klose, Petra
Lange, Silke
Langhorst, Jost
Dobos, Gustav J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary & Alternative Medicine

Cancer is acknowledged as a source of stress for many individuals, often leading to suffering, which can be long-lasting. Mindfulness-based stress reduction offers an effective way of reducing stress among cancer patients by combining mindfulness meditation and yoga in an 8-week training program. The purpose of this study was to inspect studies from October 2009 to November 2015 and examine whether mindfulness-based stress reduction can be utilized as a viable method for managing stress among cancer patients.

Author(s): 
Rush, Sarah E.
Sharma, Manoj
Publication Title: 
Pediatric Physical Therapy: The Official Publication of the Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association

PURPOSE: We completed a systematic review of the literature on the effect of yoga on quality of life and physical outcome measures in the pediatric population. We explored various databases and included case-control and pilot studies, cohort and randomized controlled trials that examined yoga as an exercise intervention for children. SUMMARY OF KEY POINTS: Using the Sackett levels of evidence, this article reviews the literature on yoga as a complementary mind-body movement therapy.

Author(s): 
Galantino, Mary Lou
Galbavy, Robyn
Quinn, Lauren
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: People with cancer undergoing active treatment experience numerous disease- and treatment-related adverse outcomes and poorer health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Exercise interventions are hypothesized to alleviate these adverse outcomes. HRQoL and its domains are important measures of cancer survivorship, both during and after the end of active treatment for cancer. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise on overall HRQoL outcomes and specific HRQoL domains among adults with cancer during active treatment.

Author(s): 
Mishra, Shiraz I.
Scherer, Roberta W.
Snyder, Claire
Geigle, Paula M.
Berlanstein, Debra R.
Topaloglu, Ozlem

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