Aphasia

Publication Title: 
Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation

PURPOSE: This article presents a systematic review of the literature pertaining to the use of yoga in stroke rehabilitation. In addition, we present the results of a small pilot study designed to explore the hypothesis that a Kundalini yoga practice of 12 weeks would lead to an improvement in aphasia as well as in fine motor coordination in stroke patients.

Author(s): 
Lynton, Holly
Kligler, Benjamin
Shiflett, Samuel
Publication Title: 
Zhongguo Zhen Jiu = Chinese Acupuncture & Moxibustion

OBJECTIVE: To assess the therapeutic effect of acupuncture for apoplectic aphasia. METHODS: A systematic review of the relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture for apoplectic aphasia was performed with Cochrance system assessment methods. The quality of researches was reviewed one by one, and data was extracted by two reviewers independently. Meta-analysis was conducted with the assistance of RevMan 5.0 software. RESULTS: Eleven randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving 756 patients were included.

Author(s): 
Pang, Yong
Wu, Liang-Bing
Liu, Dong-Hua
Publication Title: 
Zhen Ci Yan Jiu = Acupuncture Research

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of acupuncture for the aphasia. METHODS: The publications of acupuncture for the treatment of aphasia are comprehensively searched from relevant domestic medical literature databases, China National Knowledge Infrastructure and Chinese BioMedical Literature Database. Meta analysis was conducted by using the publications. RESULTS: Twenty six trials of 338 matched the selection criteria and their data were suitable for Meta analysis. The total aphasia patients were 1749.

Author(s): 
Li, Ya-feng
Kurabayashi, Yuzuru
Zhao, Si-hai
Yu, Qi
Cheng, Fang
Wang, Yan-Li
Wei, Ke-na
Liu, En-qi
Publication Title: 
Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine = Chung I Tsa Chih Ying Wen Pan

OBJECTIVE: Acupuncture has often been used for aphasia rehabilitation in China. The purpose of this paper was to: 1) provide a historic overview of acupuncture for aphasia due to stroke; 2) summarize the commonly used acupuncture approaches; and 3) objectively comment on the effectiveness of acupuncture for the rehabilitation of this type of disorder. METHODS: The Elsevier database and a Chinese database (CNKI) were searched through December, 2010 with the key words "aphasia, acupuncture" in English and Chinese, respectively.

Author(s): 
Sun, Youzhi
Xue, Steve An
Zuo, Zhengyun
Publication Title: 
Jornal De Pediatria
Author(s): 
de ANDRADE, null
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis
Author(s): 
Mason, C. F.
Publication Title: 
Neuropsychologia
Author(s): 
McKeever, W. F.
Larrabee, G. J.
Sullivan, K. F.
Johnson, H. J.
Furguson, S.
Rayport, M.
Publication Title: 
Psychological Medicine

This review of the data on bilinguals in relation to hypnosis, psychotherapy and psychotic disorders presents evidence for the bilateral representation of language in the cerebral hemispheres of bilinguals, and outlines possible links between the neuropsychology of psychotic disorders and the lateralization of language in these patients. The relationship between affective states and the retrieval of memories and language is also explored.

Author(s): 
de Zulueta, F. I.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: Unilateral nostril breathing (UNB) is a yogic pranayama technique that has been shown to improve verbal and spatial cognition in neurologically intact individuals. Early study of UNB in healthy individuals has shown benefits for attention and memory. This preliminary study explored whether UNB influenced various measures of attention, language, spatial abilities, depression, and anxiety in post-stroke individuals, both with and without aphasia.

Author(s): 
Marshall, Rebecca Shisler
Basilakos, Alexandra
Williams, Tiffany
Love-Myers, Kim
Publication Title: 
Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation

PURPOSE: We present a case study of a woman who used yogic breathing as Ayurvedic medicine in her recovery from poststroke aphasia. Ayurvedic medicine is one of the most ancient medicines of the world, but it is not widely used for aphasia rehabilitation in many Western countries. The description of this case aims to further the understanding of the benefits that this type of medicine may provide to poststroke patients living with aphasia. METHOD: After her stroke, the patient received brief conventional language therapy for her aphasia.

Author(s): 
Mohapatra, Bijoyaa
Marshall, Rebecca Shisler
Laures-Gore, Jacqueline

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