Arsenic

Publication Title: 
The Science of the Total Environment

Millions of people are at risk of groundwater arsenic contamination, but supply of arsenic-free drinking water is grossly inadequate. The present study was intended to examine if a potentized homeopathic remedy reportedly showing ameliorating potentials in people inhabiting high-risk arsenic-contaminated areas but drinking arsenic-free water, can also ameliorate arsenic toxicity in subjects living in high-risk arsenic-contaminated areas, and drinking arsenic-contaminated water.

Author(s): 
Belon, Philippe
Banerjee, Antara
Karmakar, Susanta Roy
Biswas, Surjyo Jyoti
Choudhury, Sandipan Chaki
Banerjee, Pathikrit
Das, Jayanta Kumar
Pathak, Surajit
Guha, Bibhas
Paul, Saili
Bhattacharjee, Nandini
Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman
Publication Title: 
JAMA

CONTEXT: Lead, mercury, and arsenic intoxication have been associated with the use of Ayurvedic herbal medicine product (HMPs). OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence and concentration of heavy metals in Ayurvedic HMPs manufactured in South Asia and sold in Boston-area stores and to compare estimated daily metal ingestion with regulatory standards.

Author(s): 
Saper, Robert B.
Kales, Stefanos N.
Paquin, Janet
Burns, Michael J.
Eisenberg, David M.
Davis, Roger B.
Phillips, Russell S.
Publication Title: 
JAMA

CONTEXT: Lead, mercury, and arsenic have been detected in a substantial proportion of Indian-manufactured traditional Ayurvedic medicines. Metals may be present due to the practice of rasa shastra (combining herbs with metals, minerals, and gems). Whether toxic metals are present in both US- and Indian-manufactured Ayurvedic medicines is unknown.

Author(s): 
Saper, Robert B.
Phillips, Russell S.
Sehgal, Anusha
Khouri, Nadia
Davis, Roger B.
Paquin, Janet
Thuppil, Venkatesh
Kales, Stefanos N.
Publication Title: 
JAMA

CONTEXT: Lead, mercury, and arsenic have been detected in a substantial proportion of Indian-manufactured traditional Ayurvedic medicines. Metals may be present due to the practice of rasa shastra (combining herbs with metals, minerals, and gems). Whether toxic metals are present in both US- and Indian-manufactured Ayurvedic medicines is unknown.

Author(s): 
Saper, Robert B.
Phillips, Russell S.
Sehgal, Anusha
Khouri, Nadia
Davis, Roger B.
Paquin, Janet
Thuppil, Venkatesh
Kales, Stefanos N.
Publication Title: 
The Science of the Total Environment

Arsenic and lead have been found in a number of traditional Ayurvedic medicines, and the practice of Rasa Shastra (combining herbs with metals, minerals and gems), or plant ingredients that contain these elements, may be possible sources. To obtain an estimate of arsenic and lead solubility in the human gastrointestinal tract, bioaccessibility of the two elements was measured in 42 medicines, using a physiologically-based extraction test.

Author(s): 
Koch, Iris
Moriarty, Maeve
House, Kim
Sui, Jie
Cullen, William R.
Saper, Robert B.
Reimer, Kenneth J.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

BACKGROUND: Concern has recently emerged regarding the safety of natural health products (NHPs)-therapies that are increasingly recommended by various health providers, including conventional physicians. Recognizing that most individuals in the Western world now consume vitamins and many take herbal agents, this study endeavored to determine levels of toxic element contamination within a range of NHPs.

Author(s): 
Genuis, Stephen J.
Schwalfenberg, Gerry
Siy, Anna-Kristen J.
Rodushkin, Ilya
Publication Title: 
Gut

Estimates were made of the arsenic concentration in liver specimens from nine patients having idiopathic portal hypertension (IP), and in four livers these were found to be significantly higher than those in patients with cirrhosis and in control subjects. The splenovenogram revealed extensive portosystemic collateral circulation. Corrected sinusoidal pressure and blood flow studies showed higher levels in four patients than in normal subjects. Microscopic examination of liver tissues revealed periportal fibrosis.

Author(s): 
Datta, D. V.
Mitra, S. K.
Chhuttani, P. N.
Chakravarti, R. N.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Toxicology. Clinical Toxicology

Consumption of the hepatotoxin arsenic is very common in certain geographical areas of India and occurs as a result of the intake of arsenic contaminated water, vegetables, adultered opium, ayurvedic and indigenous medicines, and "home made brew". Arsenic levels were estimated in livers obtained after autopsy from patients of idiopathic cirrhosis, alcoholic cirrhosis, Indian childhood cirrhosis, non-cirrhotic portal fibrosis, fulminant hepatitis and Wilson's disease.

Author(s): 
Narang, A. P.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

From ancient times, Swarnabhasma (gold ash) has been used in several clinical manifestations including loss of memory, defective eyesight, infertility, overall body weakness and incidence of early aging. Swarnabhasma has been used by Ayurvedic physicians to treat different diseases like bronchial asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes mellitus, nervous disorders, etc.

Author(s): 
Mitra, A.
Chakraborty, S.
Auddy, B.
Tripathi, P.
Sen, S.
Saha, A. V.
Mukherjee, B.
Publication Title: 
JAMA

CONTEXT: Lead, mercury, and arsenic intoxication have been associated with the use of Ayurvedic herbal medicine product (HMPs). OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence and concentration of heavy metals in Ayurvedic HMPs manufactured in South Asia and sold in Boston-area stores and to compare estimated daily metal ingestion with regulatory standards.

Author(s): 
Saper, Robert B.
Kales, Stefanos N.
Paquin, Janet
Burns, Michael J.
Eisenberg, David M.
Davis, Roger B.
Phillips, Russell S.

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