Arthritis, Juvenile

Publication Title: 
Pediatric Rheumatology Online Journal

BACKGROUND: To assess the quality of evidence for the effects of psychosocial therapies on pain and function in children with rheumatic diseases. METHODS: We conducted a literature search of MEDLINE and PsycINFO for randomized clinical trials of psychosocial interventions for pain and disability in children with rheumatic diseases from January 1969 to September 2015. Studies with a sample size less than 10 subjects were excluded. Study quality was assessed using the Jadad score. RESULTS: Five articles met inclusion criteria, for a total of 229 patients, aged 5 to 18 years.

Author(s): 
Cohen, Ezra M.
Morley-Fletcher, Alessio
Mehta, Darshan H.
Lee, Yvonne C.
Publication Title: 
Pediatric Rheumatology Online Journal

BACKGROUND: Despite the wealth of clinical research carried out in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), little is known about the emotional experiences of their parents. This article describes the predominant emotional experiences reported by parents of children with JIA in two Canadian cities. METHODS: Research participants included 15 experienced parents and 8 novice parents (<6†months since children's JIA diagnosis). Their children were 2 to 16†years old with various JIA categories.

Author(s): 
GÛmez-RamÌrez, Oralia
Gibbon, Michele
Berard, Roberta
Jurencak, Roman
Green, Jayne
Tucker, Lori
Shiff, Natalie
Guzman, Jaime
Publication Title: 
JAMA
Author(s): 
Cioppa, F. J.
Thal, A. B.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis
Author(s): 
Cioppa, F. J.
Thal, A. D.
Publication Title: 
Saudi Medical Journal

OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility, reliability and validity of the childhood health assessment questionnaire--modified for Arab children (CHAQ--MAC). METHODS: One hundred and eighteen modified questionnaires were completed by 75 juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) patients and their parents attending the Pediatric Rheumatology Clinic at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia over an 18 month period (January 1996 to May 1997). RESULTS: The modified questionnaire was self-administered by 82% of the parents.

Author(s): 
Madi, Sanaa M.
Al-Mayouf, Sulaiman M.
Grainger, Carol G.
Bahabri, Sultan A.
Publication Title: 
Saudi Medical Journal

OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility, reliability and validity of the childhood health assessment questionnaire--modified for Arab children (CHAQ--MAC). METHODS: One hundred and eighteen modified questionnaires were completed by 75 juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) patients and their parents attending the Pediatric Rheumatology Clinic at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia over an 18 month period (January 1996 to May 1997). RESULTS: The modified questionnaire was self-administered by 82% of the parents.

Author(s): 
Madi, Sanaa M.
Al-Mayouf, Sulaiman M.
Grainger, Carol G.
Bahabri, Sultan A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Pediatric Psychology

OBJECTIVE: To describe the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its relationship to symptoms of anxiety, depression, and dysthymia in Latino children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) or arthralgia. METHODS: Parents of 36 children between the ages of 6 and 16 years with either JIA (n = 17) or arthralgia (n = 19) completed questionnaires during routine pediatric rheumatology clinic visits assessing use of CAM and psychological functioning. RESULTS: CAM was used by the majority of children primarily to treat pain episodes.

Author(s): 
Zebracki, Kathy
Holzman, Katherine
Bitter, Kathyrn J.
Feehan, Kelly
Miller, Michael L.
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies are commonly used by pediatric patients with chronic medical conditions. Little is known about parents' perceptions of these therapies. This study describes the views of parents of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) regarding conventional and CAM therapies. METHODS: Parents of children with JIA seen at a pediatric rheumatology clinic were surveyed between June 1 and July 31, 2007.

Author(s): 
Rouster-Stevens, Kelly
Nageswaran, Savithri
Arcury, Thomas A.
Kemper, Kathi J.
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies are commonly used by pediatric patients with chronic medical conditions. Little is known about parents' perceptions of these therapies. This study describes the views of parents of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) regarding conventional and CAM therapies. METHODS: Parents of children with JIA seen at a pediatric rheumatology clinic were surveyed between June 1 and July 31, 2007.

Author(s): 
Rouster-Stevens, Kelly
Nageswaran, Savithri
Arcury, Thomas A.
Kemper, Kathi J.
Publication Title: 
Arthritis & Rheumatology (Hoboken, N.J.)

OBJECTIVE: The C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) signaling pathway is a major contributor to postnatal skeletal growth in humans. This study was undertaken to investigate whether CNP signaling could prevent growth delay and cartilage damage in an animal model of inflammatory arthritis. METHODS: We generated transgenic mice that overexpress CNP (B6.SJL-Col2a1-NPPC) in chondrocytes.

Author(s): 
Bükülmez, Hülya
Khan, Fozia
Bartels, Cynthia F.
Murakami, Shunichi
Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana
Sattar, Abdus
Haqqi, Tariq M.
Warman, Matthew L.

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