Audiometry

Publication Title: 
Psychosomatic Medicine
Author(s): 
Schneck, J. M.
Publication Title: 
Acta Oto-Laryngologica
Author(s): 
Hallewell, J. D.
Goetzinger, C. P.
Allen, M. L.
Proud, G. O.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Research
Author(s): 
Smith, W. H.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Psychology

Hypnotic deafness was suggested for 1000 Hz tones presented in random orders at seven intensities between 17 and 70 db. Subjects were 70 college students stratified into four levels of hypnotic susceptibility, ranging from low to high. Four conditions were presented within a single session. Two conditions tested normal hearing, one in waking and one in hypnosis; two tested reported loudness of the tones as reduced by hypnotic suggestion. The method of magnitude estimation was employed. Hearing reduction was found to correlate .59 with hypnotic susceptibility in the total sample.

Author(s): 
Crawford, H. J.
Macdonald, H.
Hilgard, E. R.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Auditory Research
Author(s): 
Grisanti, G.
Cusimano, F.
Traina, F.
Publication Title: 
Southern Medical Journal

BACKGROUND: Proximal intercessory prayer (PIP) is a common complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapy, but clinical effects are poorly understood, partly because studies have focused on distant intercessory prayer (DIP). METHODS: This prospective study used an audiometer (Earscan(R) 3) and vision charts (40 cm, 6 m "Illiterate E") to evaluate 24 consecutive Mozambican subjects (19 males/5 females) reporting impaired hearing (14) and/or vision (11) who subsequently received PIP interventions.

Author(s): 
Brown, Candy Gunther
Mory, Stephen C.
Williams, Rebecca
McClymond, Michael J.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

The artemisinin derivatives are now used widely in areas with multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria such as Southeast Asia, but concerns remain over their potential for neurotoxicity. Mice, rats, dogs, and monkeys treated with high doses of intramuscular artemether or arteether develop an unusual pattern of focal damage to brain stem nuclei (particularly those involved in auditory processing).

Author(s): 
van Vugt, M.
Angus, B. J.
Price, R. N.
Mann, C.
Simpson, J. A.
Poletto, C.
Htoo, S. E.
Looareesuwan, S.
White, N. J.
Nosten, F.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

Artemether-lumefantrine is the first registered, fixed, artemisinin-based combination treatment. Artemisinin derivatives are highly effective antimalarials with a favorable safety profile. Concerns remain over their potential neurotoxicity, although there has been no clinical evidence of this in humans. In animals (rats, dogs, and monkeys) artemether, a derivative of artemisinin is associated with an unusual toxicity pattern in specific brain nuclei involving the auditory and vestibular pathways.

Author(s): 
Hutagalung, Robert
Htoo, Hsar
Nwee, Paw
Arunkamomkiri, Jaruwan
Zwang, Julien
Carrara, Verena I.
Ashley, Elizabeth
Singhasivanon, Pratap
White, Nicholas J.
Nosten, François
Publication Title: 
Malaria Journal

BACKGROUND: Due to increasing drug resistance, artemisinin-based combination chemotherapy (ACT) has become the first-line treatment of falciparum malaria in many endemic countries. However, irreversible ototoxicity associated with artemether/lumefantrine (AL) has been reported recently and suggested to be a serious limitation in the use of ACT. The aim of the study was to compare ototoxicity, tolerability, and efficacy of ACT with that of quinine and atovaquone/proguanil in the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria.

Author(s): 
Gürkov, Robert
Eshetu, Teferi
Miranda, Isabel Barreto
Berens-Riha, Nicole
Mamo, Yoseph
Girma, Tsinuel
Krause, Eike
Schmidt, Michael
Hempel, John-Martin
Löscher, Thomas
Publication Title: 
Malaria Journal

BACKGROUND: The use of artemisinin derivatives has increased exponentially with the deployment of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) in all malarious areas. They are highly effective and are considered safe, but in animal studies artemisinin derivatives produce neurotoxicity targeting mainly the auditory and vestibular pathways. The debate remains as to whether artemisinin derivatives induce similar toxicity in humans.

Author(s): 
Carrara, Verena I.
Phyo, Aung P.
Nwee, Paw
Soe, Ma
Htoo, Hsar
Arunkamomkiri, Jaruwan
Singhasivanon, Pratap
Nosten, François

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