Autogenic Training

Publication Title: 
Psychosomatic Medicine

Many nonpharmacologic (behavioral) techniques are being proposed for the therapy of essential hypertension. The research in this area is reviewed and divided roughly into two categories: the biofeedback and relaxation methodologies. While feedback can be used to lower pressures during laboratory training sessions, studies designed to alter basal blood pressure levels with biofeedback have not yet been reported. The absence of evidence for such changes through biofeedback limits the usefulness of this technique in hypertension control.

Author(s): 
Frumkin, K.
Nathan, R. J.
Prout, M. F.
Cohen, M. C.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Anxiety during pregnancy is a common problem. Anxiety and stress could have consequences on the course of the pregnancy and the later development of the child. Anxiety responds well to treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and/or medication. Non-pharmacological interventions such as mind-body interventions, known to decrease anxiety in several clinical situations, might be offered for treating and preventing anxiety during pregnancy.

Author(s): 
Marc, Isabelle
Toureche, Narimane
Ernst, Edzard
Hodnett, Ellen D.
Blanchet, Claudine
Dodin, Sylvie
Njoya, Merlin M.
Publication Title: 
Psychosomatic Medicine

Many nonpharmacologic (behavioral) techniques are being proposed for the therapy of essential hypertension. The research in this area is reviewed and divided roughly into two categories: the biofeedback and relaxation methodologies. While feedback can be used to lower pressures during laboratory training sessions, studies designed to alter basal blood pressure levels with biofeedback have not yet been reported. The absence of evidence for such changes through biofeedback limits the usefulness of this technique in hypertension control.

Author(s): 
Frumkin, K.
Nathan, R. J.
Prout, M. F.
Cohen, M. C.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Anxiety during pregnancy is a common problem. Anxiety and stress could have consequences on the course of the pregnancy and the later development of the child. Anxiety responds well to treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy and/or medication. Non-pharmacological interventions such as mind-body interventions, known to decrease anxiety in several clinical situations, might be offered for treating and preventing anxiety during pregnancy.

Author(s): 
Marc, Isabelle
Toureche, Narimane
Ernst, Edzard
Hodnett, Ellen D.
Blanchet, Claudine
Dodin, Sylvie
Njoya, Merlin M.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To determine from the published evidence whether autogenic training as sole therapy is effective for prevention of tension-type headaches in adults. METHOD: Systematic review of controlled trials. Literature searches were performed in January 2005 in six major databases, specifically Medline, EMBASE, AMED, CENTRAL, PsychInfo and CINAHL and information was extracted and evaluated in a pre-defined manner. RESULTS: Seven controlled clinical trials were included in the review. The methodological quality of these studies was low.

Author(s): 
Kanji, N.
White, A. R.
Ernst, E.
Publication Title: 
Der Ophthalmologe: Zeitschrift Der Deutschen Ophthalmologischen Gesellschaft

BACKGROUND: Glaucoma is currently the second most common cause of severe visual impairment and blindness worldwide. Standard pharmaceutical and surgical interventions often fail to prevent progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether adjuvantly applied self-relaxation techniques can significantly impact intraocular pressure, ocular perfusion and the overall mental state of affected patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A search of the literature was carried out and a comprehensive overview of currently available data is presented.

Author(s): 
Bertelmann, T.
Strempel, I.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Behavioral Medicine

This article reviews controlled trials of hypnotic treatment for chronic pain in terms of: (1) analyses comparing the effects of hypnotic treatment to six types of control conditions; (2) component analyses; and (3) predictor analyses. The findings indicate that hypnotic analgesia produces significantly greater decreases in pain relative to no-treatment and to some non-hypnotic interventions such as medication management, physical therapy, and education/advice.

Author(s): 
Jensen, Mark
Patterson, David R.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To examine the efficacy and safety of hypnotherapy for insomnia as compared to placebo, pharmacological or non-pharmacological intervention, or no treatment. METHODS: A systematic search on major electronic databases was conducted up until March 2014. Inclusion criteria are: (1) randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs; (2) intervention targeted at improving sleep; (3) hypnosis as an intervention; and (4) English language articles. Sleep diary variable is the primary outcome measure.

Author(s): 
Lam, Tak-Ho
Chung, Ka-Fai
Yeung, Wing-Fai
Yu, Branda Yee-Man
Yung, Kam-Ping
Ng, Tommy Ho-Yee
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

Hypnosis is regarded as an effective treatment for psychological and physical ailments. However, its efficacy as a strategy for managing chronic pain has not been assessed through meta-analytical methods. The objective of the current study was to conduct a meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of hypnosis for managing chronic pain. When compared with standard care, hypnosis provided moderate treatment benefit. Hypnosis also showed a moderate superior effect as compared to other psychological interventions for a nonheadache group.

Author(s): 
Adachi, Tomonori
Fujino, Haruo
Nakae, Aya
Mashimo, Takashi
Sasaki, Jun
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Psychotherapy
Author(s): 
Mueller-Hegemann, D.

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