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Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: A 1977 study by Melzack et al. reported 100% anatomic and 71% clinical pain correspondences of myofascial trigger points and classical acupuncture points in the treatment of pain disorders. A reanalysis of this study's data using different acupuncture resources by Birch a quarter century later concluded that correlating trigger points to classical acupuncture points was not conceptually possible and that the only class of acupuncture points that could were the a shi points. Moreover, Birch concluded that no more than 40% of the acupuncture points examined by Melzack et al.

Author(s): 
Dorsher, Peter T.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: A 1977 study by Melzack et al. reported 100% anatomic and 71% clinical pain correspondences of myofascial trigger points and classical acupuncture points in the treatment of pain disorders. A reanalysis of this study's data using different acupuncture resources by Birch a quarter century later concluded that correlating trigger points to classical acupuncture points was not conceptually possible and that the only class of acupuncture points that could were the a shi points. Moreover, Birch concluded that no more than 40% of the acupuncture points examined by Melzack et al.

Author(s): 
Dorsher, Peter T.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

The role played by nonspecialized connective tissues in chronic non-specific low back pain is not well understood. In a recent ultrasound study, human subjects with chronic low back pain had altered connective tissue structure compared to human subjects without low back pain, suggesting the presence of inflammation and/or fibrosis in the low back pain subjects. Mechanical input in the form of static tissue stretch has been shown in vitro and in vivo to have anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects.

Author(s): 
Corey, Sarah M.
Vizzard, Margaret A.
Bouffard, Nicole A.
Badger, Gary J.
Langevin, Helene M.
Publication Title: 
South Dakota Medicine: The Journal of the South Dakota State Medical Association

Basal cell carcinoma is the most common form of skin cancer, with giant basal cell carcinoma comprising only 0.5 percent of all basal cell carcinomas. When a basal cell carcinoma is larger than 5 cm, it is designated as a giant basal cell carcinoma. Neglect is often a contributing factor to these lesions, and local recurrence and metastasis is not uncommon. Presented is a case of a 66-year-old man who presented with a chief complaint of increasing shortness of breath and fatigue.

Author(s): 
Laudenschlager, Mark D.
Donelan, Kent J.
Lynch, Douglas W.
Stephenson, Phillip D.
Timmerman, Gary L.
Jassim, Ali D.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

The role played by nonspecialized connective tissues in chronic non-specific low back pain is not well understood. In a recent ultrasound study, human subjects with chronic low back pain had altered connective tissue structure compared to human subjects without low back pain, suggesting the presence of inflammation and/or fibrosis in the low back pain subjects. Mechanical input in the form of static tissue stretch has been shown in vitro and in vivo to have anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects.

Author(s): 
Corey, Sarah M.
Vizzard, Margaret A.
Bouffard, Nicole A.
Badger, Gary J.
Langevin, Helene M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology: Official Journal of the International Society of Electrophysiological Kinesiology

Understanding the clinical characteristics of patients with low back pain (LBP) who display improved lumbar multifidus (LM) muscle function after spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) may provide insight into a potentially synergistic interaction between SMT and exercise. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the baseline historical and physical examination factors associated with increased contracted LM muscle thickness one week after SMT.

Author(s): 
Koppenhaver, Shane L.
Fritz, Julie M.
Hebert, Jeffrey J.
Kawchuk, Greg N.
Parent, Eric C.
Gill, Norman W.
Childs, John D.
Teyhen, Deydre S.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

Swedish massage technique includes mechanically activated muscular tissue and also skin, tendons, fascias, and connected tissue, which indirectly regulates the tonus of the autonomous nervous system. This study set out to examine the effects of Swedish massage on blood pressure. Healthy males were given massage treatment at the Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Treatment was over a 12-week period divided into three parts, each consisting of 4 weeks.

Author(s): 
Aourell, Moa
Skoog, Martina
Carleson, J.
Publication Title: 
Lasers in Surgery and Medicine

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Skin laxity of the body is a growing cosmetic concern. Laxity can result from chronological or photoaging and changes in body dimensions during pregnancy or weight loss. The end result is loose, sagging skin, and localized fat deposits. Liposuction and abdominoplasty or brachioplasty are established approaches to these issues. Patient desire for alternatives to surgical correction has spawned the development of non-invasive body contouring devices.

Author(s): 
Brightman, Lori
Weiss, Elliot
Chapas, Anne M.
Karen, Julie
Hale, Elizabeth
Bernstein, Leonard
Geronemus, Roy G.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: This study's objective was to determine the effect of therapeutic massage on peripheral blood flow utilizing dynamic infrared thermography in a constant temperature/humidity thermal chamber to assess noncontact skin temperature. DESIGN: The design was a repeated-measures crossover experimental design; the independent variable was treatment condition (massage, light touch, control). SETTING: The study setting was a university research laboratory. SUBJECTS: Seventeen (17) healthy volunteers (8 males/9 females; age = 23.29 +/- 3.06) took part in the study.

Author(s): 
Sefton, Joellen M.
Yarar, Ceren
Berry, Jack W.
Pascoe, David D.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Anesthesia

Massage therapy promotes psychosocial relaxation, reduces stress and has been reported to improve the immune function. As such, massage therapy is currently used in palliative care for the relief of anxiety and pain. Although psychosocial status has been evaluated using subjective psychological tests, such as State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), subjective psychological tests are of limited value if the subjects fail to report reliably. Salivary biomarkers have been recently suggested as useful objective markers for assessing psychosocial status.

Author(s): 
Noto, Yuka
Kudo, Mihoko
Hirota, Kazuyoshi

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