Basal Metabolism

Publication Title: 
Integrative and Comparative Biology

More than 100 years ago, Max Rubner combined the fact that both metabolic rate and longevity of mammals varies with body size to calculate that "life energy potential" (lifetime energy turnover per kilogram) was relatively constant. This calculation linked longevity to aerobic metabolism which in turn led to the "rate-of-living" and ultimately the "oxidative stress" theories of aging. However, the link between metabolic rate and longevity is imperfect.

Author(s): 
Hulbert, A. J.
Publication Title: 
Integrative and Comparative Biology

More than 100 years ago, Max Rubner combined the fact that both metabolic rate and longevity of mammals varies with body size to calculate that "life energy potential" (lifetime energy turnover per kilogram) was relatively constant. This calculation linked longevity to aerobic metabolism which in turn led to the "rate-of-living" and ultimately the "oxidative stress" theories of aging. However, the link between metabolic rate and longevity is imperfect.

Author(s): 
Hulbert, A. J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

OBJECTIVES: To assess the associations among age, health status, and resting metabolic rate (RMR) in a large population of older adults. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis. SETTING: Community-dwelling volunteers from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA). PARTICIPANTS: Persons aged 40 to 96 (mean 68.2 ± 11.0) who underwent a comprehensive physical examination, cognitive assessment, RMR testing, body composition assessment, and physical function testing during a 3-day clinic visit (N = 420).

Author(s): 
Schrack, Jennifer A.
Knuth, Nicolas D.
Simonsick, Eleanor M.
Ferrucci, Luigi
Publication Title: 
Psychiatric Research Reports
Author(s): 
Shock, N. W.
Publication Title: 
Gerontology

The underlying mechanism of calorie restriction (CR) extension of mammalian life spans operates by altering the rate of decline in reserve capacity (with time) as well as the exposure to growth stimulus, two mechanisms that seem to be related to the central genetically determined mechanism that controls mammalian life span over a 50-fold range.

Author(s): 
Parr, T.
Publication Title: 
The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

Caloric restriction increases life span in many types of animals. This article proposes a mechanism for this effect based on the hypothesis that metabolic stability, the capacity of an organism to maintain steady state values of redox couples, is a prime determinant of longevity. We integrate the stability-longevity hypothesis with a molecular model of metabolic activity (quantum metabolism), and an entropic theory of evolutionary change (directionality theory), to propose a proximate mechanism and an evolutionary rationale for aging.

Author(s): 
Demetrius, Lloyd
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

BACKGROUND: Prolonged dietary restriction increases the life span in rodents. Some evidence suggests that alternate-day fasting may also prolong the life span. OBJECTIVE: Our goal was to determine whether alternate-day fasting is a feasible method of dietary restriction in nonobese humans and whether it improves known biomarkers of longevity. DESIGN: Nonobese subjects (8 men and 8 women) fasted every other day for 22 d.

Author(s): 
Heilbronn, Leonie K.
Smith, Steven R.
Martin, Corby K.
Anton, Stephen D.
Ravussin, Eric
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

This article discusses the significance of mouse models as a basis for elucidating the aging process in humans. We identify certain parallels between mouse and human systems and review the theoretical and empirical support for the claim that the large divergence in the rate of aging between the two species resides in differences in the stability of their metabolic networks. We will show that these differences in metabolic stability have their origin in the different ecological constraints the species experience during their evolutionary history.

Author(s): 
Demetrius, Lloyd
Publication Title: 
The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

Comparative studies of aging are often difficult to interpret because of the different factors that tend to correlate with longevity. We used the AnAge database to study these factors, particularly metabolism and developmental schedules, previously associated with longevity in vertebrate species. Our results show that, after correcting for body mass and phylogeny, basal metabolic rate does not correlate with longevity in eutherians or birds, although it negatively correlates with marsupial longevity and time to maturity.

Author(s): 
de Magalh„es, Jo„o Pedro
Costa, Joana
Church, George M.
Publication Title: 
Integrative and Comparative Biology

More than 100 years ago, Max Rubner combined the fact that both metabolic rate and longevity of mammals varies with body size to calculate that "life energy potential" (lifetime energy turnover per kilogram) was relatively constant. This calculation linked longevity to aerobic metabolism which in turn led to the "rate-of-living" and ultimately the "oxidative stress" theories of aging. However, the link between metabolic rate and longevity is imperfect.

Author(s): 
Hulbert, A. J.

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