Baths

Publication Title: 
Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health

The control of labor pain and prevention of suffering are major concerns of clinicians and their clients. Nonpharmacologic approaches toward these goals are consistent with midwifery management and the choices of many women. We undertook a literature search of scientific articles cataloged in CINAHL, PUBMED, the Cochrane Library, and AMED databases relating to the effectiveness of 13 non-pharmacologic methods used to relieve pain and reduce suffering in labor. Suffering, which is different from pain, is not an outcome that is usually measured after childbirth.

Author(s): 
Simkin, Penny
Bolding, April
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Psychophysiology: Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology

During hypnosis it is easy to induce hallucinations having, for the hypnotized subject, the characteristics and the concreteness of reality. This study was performed to put in evidence the physical effects of hypnotic suggestion of warm tub bathing. 18 volunteers screened for high hypnotizability were studied.

Author(s): 
Casiglia, Edoardo
Rossi, Augusto
Tikhonoff, Valérie
Scarpa, Roberta
Tibaldeschi, Giorgio
Giacomello, Margherita
Canna, Paola
Schiavon, Laura
Rizzato, Alessandra
Lapenta, Antonio M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Advanced Nursing

Aromatherapy is a movement growth in popularity, but lacking scientific justification in the field of practice, although laboratory experiments are in evidence. Lavender oil is frequently selected for aromatherapy as having antiseptic and healing properties. More specifically, it has been used as a bath additive postnatally to reduce perineal discomfort. A blind randomized clinical trial is described, involving three groups of mothers, one using pure lavender oil, one a synthetic lavender oil and one an inert substance as a bath additive for 10 days following normal childbirth.

Author(s): 
Dale, A.
Cornwell, S.
Publication Title: 
Contact Dermatitis
Author(s): 
Clark, S. M.
Wilkinson, S. M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health

The control of labor pain and prevention of suffering are major concerns of clinicians and their clients. Nonpharmacologic approaches toward these goals are consistent with midwifery management and the choices of many women. We undertook a literature search of scientific articles cataloged in CINAHL, PUBMED, the Cochrane Library, and AMED databases relating to the effectiveness of 13 non-pharmacologic methods used to relieve pain and reduce suffering in labor. Suffering, which is different from pain, is not an outcome that is usually measured after childbirth.

Author(s): 
Simkin, Penny
Bolding, April
Publication Title: 
Journal of obstetric, gynecologic, and neonatal nursing: JOGNN / NAACOG

OBJECTIVE: To examine variation in feminine hygiene practices as a function of increasing age. DESIGN: A nonexperimental, descriptive research design with study sample stratified by age. PARTICIPANTS: Women over 18 years of age. Of 713 women who completed and returned the feminine hygiene practices questionnaire, 180 were younger than 41 years, 171 were 41-48 years, 184 were 49-57 years, and 178 were 58 years or older. All participants were members of a California professional home economics organization.

Author(s): 
Czerwinski, B. S.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Dermatology

BACKGROUND: In a pilot study performed in eight mosques in the Durban area, it was found that the prevalence of tinea pedis et unguium in the adult Muslim male population regularly attending mosques was higher than in the nonMuslim male population. The aims of the present study were: (i) to determine the prevalence of tinea pedis et unguium in the adult Muslim male population regularly attending mosques; (ii) to investigate the role of mosque carpets and ablution areas in the spread of infection; and (iii) to develop strategies to combat the infection.

Author(s): 
Raboobee, N.
Aboobaker, J.
Peer, A. K.
Publication Title: 
Research in Nursing & Health

A single-group crossover design was used to examine the effects of a warm footbath on body temperatures, distal-proximal skin temperature gradient (DPG), and sleep outcomes in 15 Taiwanese elders with self-reported sleep disturbance. Body temperatures and polysomnography were recorded for three consecutive nights. Participants were assigned randomly to receive a 41 degrees C footbath for 40 minutes before sleep onset on night 2 or night 3. Mean DPG before lights off was significantly elevated on the bathing night.

Author(s): 
Liao, Wen-Chun
Chiu, Ming-Jang
Landis, Carol A.
Publication Title: 
Zhurnal Nevropatologii I Psikhiatrii Imeni S.S. Korsakova (Moscow, Russia: 1952)

In the Pyatigorsk resort, 226 children from 3-7 years of age with different forms of cerebral paralysis were studied. For therapeutic purposes, besides general health improvement measures, remedial gymnastic and massage, such resort factors as carbon dioxide and sulfurated hydrogen and radon baths of different concentrations and mud procedures were used. As a result of such studies, some indications for referrals of preschool children with cerebral paralysis to balneomud resorts were outlined.

Author(s): 
Babina, L. M.
Publication Title: 
Zhurnal Nevropatologii I Psikhiatrii Imeni S.S. Korsakova (Moscow, Russia: 1952)

The results of balneotherapy in patients with cerebroasthenic and hypertensive syndromes are described. Twenty-four children were examined electrophysiologically and neuropsychologically before and after sanatorium treatment. Massage, exercises, drug therapy, radon and carbon dioxide and sulfurated hydrogen baths were used. Sanatorium treatment resulted in a significant improvement of the general condition, of bioelectrical cerebral activity, of brain hemo- and CSF-dynamics as well as in the recovery of cortical functional activity.

Author(s): 
Dadiomova, M. A.
Shipitsyna, L. M.
Goriachkina, M. V.
Gendel's, B. S.
Babina, L. M.

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