Bee Venoms

Publication Title: 
The Journal of Pain: Official Journal of the American Pain Society

Bee venom (BV) acupuncture (BVA) involves injecting diluted BV into acupoints and is used for arthritis, pain, and rheumatoid diseases. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence for the effectiveness of BVA in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain. Seventeen electronic databases were systematically searched up to September 2007 with no language restrictions. All randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of BVA for patients with musculoskeletal pain were considered for inclusion if they included placebo controls or were controlled against a comparator intervention.

Author(s): 
Lee, Myeong Soo
Pittler, Max H.
Shin, Byung-Cheul
Kong, Jae Cheol
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
BMJ open

INTRODUCTION: This systematic review aims to analyse the trial data on the effects of bee venom acupuncture (BVA) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Author(s): 
Lee, Ju Ah
Son, Mi Ju
Choi, Jiae
Yun, Kyung-Jin
Jun, Ji Hee
Lee, Myeong Soo
Publication Title: 
BMJ open

OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical evidence for bee venom acupuncture (BVA) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). DESIGN: Systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). SETTING: We searched 14 databases up to March 2014 without a language restriction. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with RA. INTERVENTION: BVA involved injecting purified, diluted BV into acupoints. We included trials on BVA used alone or in combination with a conventional therapy versus the conventional therapy alone.

Author(s): 
Lee, Ju Ah
Son, Mi Ju
Choi, Jiae
Jun, Ji Hee
Kim, Jong-In
Lee, Myeong Soo
Publication Title: 
Journal of Integrative Medicine

BACKGROUND: Shoulder pain is a common complication of stroke. Bee venom acupuncture (BVA) is increasingly used in the treatment of post-stroke shoulder pain. OBJECTIVE: To summarize and evaluate evidence on the effectiveness of BVA in relieving shoulder pain after stroke.

Author(s): 
Lim, Sung Min
Lee, Sook-Hyun
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Acne is a chronic skin disease characterised by inflamed spots and blackheads on the face, neck, back, and chest. Cysts and scarring can also occur, especially in more severe disease. People with acne often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and dietary modifications, because of their concerns about the adverse effects of conventional medicines. However, evidence for CAM therapies has not been systematically assessed. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects and safety of any complementary therapies in people with acne vulgaris.

Author(s): 
Cao, Huijuan
Yang, Guoyan
Wang, Yuyi
Liu, Jian Ping
Smith, Caroline A.
Luo, Hui
Liu, Yueming
Publication Title: 
PloS One

OBJECTIVE: The safety of bee venom as a therapeutic compound has been extensively studied, resulting in the identification of potential adverse events, which range from trivial skin reactions that usually resolve over several days to life-threating severe immunological responses such as anaphylaxis. In this systematic review, we provide a summary of the types and prevalence of adverse events associated with bee venom therapy. METHODS: We searched the literature using 12 databases from their inception to June 2014, without language restrictions.

Author(s): 
Park, Jeong Hwan
Yim, Bo Kyung
Lee, Jun-Hwan
Lee, Sanghun
Kim, Tae-Hun
Publication Title: 
PLoS pathogens

A new generation of strategies is evolving that aim to block malaria transmission by employing genetically modified vectors or mosquito pathogens or symbionts that express anti-parasite molecules. Whilst transgenic technologies have advanced rapidly, there is still a paucity of effector molecules with potent anti-malaria activity whose expression does not cause detrimental effects on mosquito fitness. Our objective was to examine a wide range of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) for their toxic effects on Plasmodium and anopheline mosquitoes.

Author(s): 
Carter, Victoria
Underhill, Ann
Baber, Ibrahima
Sylla, Lakamy
Baby, Mounirou
Larget-Thiery, Isabelle
Zettor, AgnËs
Bourgouin, Catherine
Langel, Ulo
Faye, Ingrid
Otvos, Laszlo
Wade, John D.
Coulibaly, Mamadou B.
Traoré, Sekou F.
Tripet, Frederic
Eggleston, Paul
Hurd, Hilary
Publication Title: 
Alternative Medicine Review: A Journal of Clinical Therapeutic

Insects and insect-derived products have been widely used in folk healing in many parts of the world since ancient times. Promising treatments have at least preliminarily been studied experimentally. Maggots and honey have been used to heal chronic and post-surgical wounds and have been shown to be comparable to conventional dressings in numerous settings. Honey has also been applied to treat burns. Honey has been combined with beeswax in the care of several dermatologic disorders, including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, tinea, pityriasis versicolor, and diaper dermatitis.

Author(s): 
Cherniack, E. Paul
Publication Title: 
Pharmacology

Recently, paeoniflorin (PF) administered systemically was found to have analgesic effects against inflammatory pain and hypersensitivity in a naloxone-reversible manner. In the present study, we adopted intrathecal administration to evaluate whether PF has direct antinociceptive actions at the spinal level. Pain-related behaviors and spinal c-Fos expression were induced by subcutaneous injection of bee venom (BV) into one hind paw of a rat.

Author(s): 
Yu, Hou-You
Mu, De-guang
Chen, Jun
Yin, Wen
Publication Title: 
Journal of Veterinary Science

The objective of this study was to determine the clincotherapeutic effect of whole bee venom in hypogalactic sows postpartum. Sows after parturition were assigned to treated and nontreated control groups. In the treated group, 22 sows were bee acupunctured once a day for 3 consecutive days. Honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) for bee acupuncture were about 15 days after metamorphosis. One live bee was used to sting the acupoints known as Yang-ming (ST-18, 1.5 cm lateral to the base of the last 2 pairs of teats) and Jiao-chao (GV-1, at the indentation between the base of tail and the anus).

Author(s): 
Choi, S. H.
Kang, S. S.

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