Bifidobacterium

Publication Title: 
Biogerontology

Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria are probiotic bacteria that modify host defense systems and have the ability to extend the lifespan of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Here, we attempted to elucidate the mechanism by which bifidobacteria prolong the lifespan of C. elegans. When the nematode was fed Bifidobacterium infantis (BI) mixed at various ratios with the standard food bacterium Escherichia coli strain OP50 (OP), the mean lifespan of worms was extended in a dose-dependent manner. Worms fed BI displayed higher locomotion and produced more offspring than control worms.

Author(s): 
Komura, Tomomi
Ikeda, Takanori
Yasui, Chikako
Saeki, Shigeru
Nishikawa, Yoshikazu
Publication Title: 
Food Microbiology

Currently, the species Bifidobacterium animalis consists of two subspecies, B. animalis subsp. lactis and B. animalis subsp. animalis. Among these two subspecies, B. animalis subsp. lactis is especially important because it is widely used in the manufacture of probiotic dairy products. The application of these microbes in the food industry demands fast, accurate and low cost methods to differentiate between species and strains.

Author(s): 
Ruiz-Moyano, Santiago
Tao, Nannan
Underwood, Mark A.
Mills, David A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

OBJECTIVES: Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) are the third most abundant component of breast milk. Our laboratory has previously revealed gene clusters specifically linked to HMO metabolism in selected bifidobacteria isolated from fecal samples of infants. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that growth of selected bifidobacteria on HMO stimulates the intestinal epithelium. METHODS: Caco-2 and HT-29 cells were incubated with lactose (LAC)- or HMO-grown Bifidobacterium longum subsp infantis (B infantis) or B bifidum.

Author(s): 
Chichlowski, Maciej
De Lartigue, Guillaume
German, J. Bruce
Raybould, Helen E.
Mills, David A.
Publication Title: 
Advances in Nutrition (Bethesda, Md.)

Bifidobacteria are commonly used as probiotics in dairy foods. Select bifidobacterial species are also early colonizers of the breast-fed infant colon; however, the mechanism for this enrichment is unclear. We previously showed that Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis is a prototypical bifidobacterial species that can readily utilize human milk oligosaccharides as the sole carbon source. MS-based glycoprofiling has revealed that numerous B. infantis strains preferentially consume small mass oligosaccharides, abundant in human milks. Genome sequencing revealed that B.

Author(s): 
Garrido, Daniel
Barile, Daniela
Mills, David A.
Publication Title: 
Molecular & cellular proteomics: MCP

Breastfeeding is one of the main factors guiding the composition of the infant gut microbiota in the first months of life. This process is shaped in part by the high amounts of human milk oligosaccharides that serve as a carbon source for saccharolytic bacteria such as Bifidobacterium species. Infant-borne bifidobacteria have developed various molecular strategies for utilizing these oligosaccharides as a carbon source. We hypothesized that these species also interact with N-glycans found in host glycoproteins that are structurally similar to free oligosaccharides in human milk.

Author(s): 
Garrido, Daniel
Nwosu, Charles
Ruiz-Moyano, Santiago
Aldredge, Danielle
German, J. Bruce
Lebrilla, Carlito B.
Mills, David A.
Publication Title: 
Food Microbiology

Prebiotics are non-digestible substrates that stimulate the growth of beneficial microbial populations in the intestine, especially Bifidobacterium species. Among them, fructo- and galacto-oligosaccharides are commonly used in the food industry, especially as a supplement for infant formulas. Mechanistic details on the enrichment of bifidobacteria by these prebiotics are important to understand the effects of these dietary interventions. In this study the consumption of galactooligosaccharides was studied for 22 isolates of Bifidobacterium longum subsp.

Author(s): 
Garrido, Daniel
Ruiz-Moyano, Santiago
Jimenez-Espinoza, Rogelio
Eom, Hyun-Ju
Block, David E.
Mills, David A.
Publication Title: 
Vaccine

Breast milk (colostrum [col]/milk) components and gut commensals play important roles in neonatal immune maturation, establishment of gut homeostasis and immune responses to enteric pathogens and oral vaccines. We investigated the impact of colonization by probiotics, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (Bb12) with/without col/milk (mimicking breast/formula fed infants) on B lymphocyte responses to an attenuated (Att) human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain vaccine in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig model.

Author(s): 
Chattha, Kuldeep S.
Vlasova, Anastasia N.
Kandasamy, Sukumar
Esseili, Malak A.
Siegismund, Christine
Rajashekara, Gireesh
Saif, Linda J.
Publication Title: 
Microbiology (Reading, England)

Human milk is a rich source of nutrients and energy, shaped by mammalian evolution to provide all the nutritive requirements of the newborn. In addition, several molecules in breast milk act as bioactive agents, playing an important role in infant protection and guiding a proper development. While major breast milk nutrients such as lactose, lipids and proteins are readily digested and consumed by the infant, other molecules, such as human milk oligosaccharides and glycosylated proteins and lipids, can escape intestinal digestion and transit through the gastrointestinal tract.

Author(s): 
Garrido, Daniel
Dallas, David C.
Mills, David A.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis is a common member of the intestinal microbiota in breast-fed infants and capable of metabolizing human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). To investigate the bacterial response to different prebiotics, we analyzed both cell wall associated and whole cell proteins in B. infantis. Proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS followed by comparative proteomics to deduce the protein localization within the cell.

Author(s): 
Kim, Jae-Han
An, Hyun Joo
Garrido, Daniel
German, J. Bruce
Lebrilla, Carlito B.
Mills, David A.
Publication Title: 
Applied and Environmental Microbiology

Human milk contains a high concentration of complex oligosaccharides that influence the composition of the intestinal microbiota in breast-fed infants. Previous studies have indicated that select species such as Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis and Bifidobacterium bifidum can utilize human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) in vitro as the sole carbon source, while the relatively few B. longum subsp. longum and Bifidobacterium breve isolates tested appear less adapted to these substrates. Considering the high frequency at which B.

Author(s): 
Ruiz-Moyano, Santiago
Totten, Sarah M.
Garrido, Daniel A.
Smilowitz, Jennifer T.
German, J. Bruce
Lebrilla, Carlito B.
Mills, David A.

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