Biomedical Enhancement

Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

Discussions of genetic enhancements often imply deep suspicions about human desires to manipulate or enhance the course of our future. These unspoken assumptions about the arrogance of the quest for perfection are at odds with the normally hopeful resonancy we find in contemporary theology. The author argues that these fears, suspicions and accusations are misplaced. The problem lies not with the question of whether we should pursue perfection, but rather what perfection we are pursuing.

Author(s): 
Keenan, James F.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Religion and Health

The use of psychopharmaceuticals as an enhancement technology has been the focus of attention in the bioethics literature. However, there has been little examination of the challenges that this practice creates for religious traditions that place importance on questions of being, authenticity, and identity. We asked expert commentators from six major world religions to consider the issues raised by psychopharmaceuticals as an enhancement technology.

Author(s): 
Fitzpatrick, Scott J.
Jordens, Christopher F. C.
Kerridge, Ian H.
Keown, Damien
Walter, James J.
Nelson, Paul
Abdalla, Mohamad
Lehmann, Lisa Soleymani
Sarma, Deepak
Publication Title: 
Health care analysis: HCA: journal of health philosophy and policy

There are positive views towards use of science and technology in all Asian countries, and positive views towards use of enhancement in China, India and Thailand. After considering of the widespread use of cosmetic surgery and other body enhancements in Asian countries, and the generally positive views towards letting individuals make choices about improvement of themselves, the paper concludes that we can expect other enhancements to also be adopted rapidly in Asia.

Author(s): 
Macer, Darryl
Publication Title: 
The New Bioethics: A Multidisciplinary Journal of Biotechnology and the Body

The literature on Human Enhancement may indeed have reached a critical mass yet theological engagement with the subject is still thin. Human Enhancement has already been established as a key topic within research and captivating visions of the future have been allied with a depth of philosophical analysis. Some Transhumanists have pointed to a theological dimension to their position and some who have warned against enhancement might be seen as having done so from a perspective shaped by a Judeo-Christian worldview.

Author(s): 
Tomkins, Justin
Publication Title: 
Cambridge quarterly of healthcare ethics: CQ: the international journal of healthcare ethics committees

According to human enhancement advocates, it is morally permissible (and sometimes obligatory) to use biomedical means to modulate or select certain biological traits in order to increase people's welfare, even when there is no pathology to be treated or prevented. Some authors have recently proposed to extend the use of biomedical means to modulate lust, attraction, and attachment.

Author(s): 
Giubilini, Alberto
Publication Title: 
Cambridge quarterly of healthcare ethics: CQ: the international journal of healthcare ethics committees

I raise several concerns with Earp and colleagues' analysis of enhancement through neurochemical modulation of love as a key issue in contemporary neuroethics.

Author(s): 
Bamford, Rebecca
Publication Title: 
Cambridge quarterly of healthcare ethics: CQ: the international journal of healthcare ethics committees

This is a critique of Earp, Sandberg and Savulescu's argument in support of a possible future neuromodulation of love and love-related relationships. I argue that, contrary to what is suggested by Earp, Sandberg and Savulescu, we do have good reason to be concerned about that possibility as well as about the medicalization of love that its pursuit would bring about.

Author(s): 
Hauskeller, Michael
Publication Title: 
Bioethics

Recently, some have proposed moral bioenhancement as a solution to the serious moral evils that humans face. Seemingly disillusioned with traditional methods of moral education, proponents of bioenhancement believe that we should pursue and apply biotechnological means to morally enhance human beings. Such proposal has generated a lively debate about the permissibility of moral bioenhancement. We argue here that such debate is specious.

Author(s): 
de Melo-Martin, Inmaculada
Salles, Arleen
Subscribe to RSS - Biomedical Enhancement