Blood Donors

Publication Title: 
International Journal of Molecular Medicine

The sirtuin 1 protein (SIRT1) is a member of the class III NAD+-dependent histone deacetylases, which are also referred to as the 'sirtuins'. The sirtuins and silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) in particular, are known to play a role in the response to DNA damage, metabolism, longevity and carcinogenesis. SIRT1 regulates different cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis through deacetylation of important regulatory proteins such as p53, FOXO3a and NFkappaB.

Author(s): 
Engel, Nicole
Mahlknecht, Ulrich
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Psychology

In a field setting, students (N = 3600) on different campus locations were solicited to give blood during a special one-day drive. Solicitations were made through face-to-face interactions. The solicitors wore a white T-shirt with different inscriptions: no inscription, Loving = Helping, Donating = Helping. Results showed that, when compared to the no inscription condition, the number of donors increased when the solicitor-confederates wore the T-shirt Loving = Helping whereas no effect was found when the confederates wore the T-shirt Donating = Helping.

Author(s): 
Charles-Sire, Virginie
GuÈguen, Nicolas
Pascual, Alexandre
Meineri, SÈbastien
Publication Title: 
Transfusion and Apheresis Science: Official Journal of the World Apheresis Association: Official Journal of the European Society for Haemapheresis

This field study on blood donor behavior tests the effectiveness of semantic priming on donor intention and commitment. Using face-to-face interactions, participants were primed with the concept of love and solicited to promise blood to the French National Blood Bank. Results showed a significant effect on willingness to donate blood and on donor commitment. The relatively simple and easily implemented technique used in this study could be of interest in improving performance of recruitment and retention campaigns.

Author(s): 
Charles-Sire, Virginie
GuÈguen, Nicolas
Meineri, SÈbastien
Martin, AngÈlique
Bullock, Andrea
Publication Title: 
Clinical Transplantation

The aim of this study was to explore the public's feelings and ideas with regard to receiving transplants of different origins. Sixty-nine individuals with varying sociodemographic background, selected from samples who had responded to a questionnaire on receiving and donating organs, were interviewed in-depth. A wide variety of reactions was displayed.

Author(s): 
Sanner, M. A.
Publication Title: 
Health care analysis: HCA: journal of health philosophy and policy

The World Health Organisation encourages that blood donation becomes voluntary and unremunerated, a system already operated in the UK. Drawing on public documents and videos, this paper argues that blood donation is regarded and presented as altruistic and supererogatory. In advertisements, donation is presented as something undertaken for the benefit of others, a matter attracting considerable gratitude from recipients and the collecting organisation.

Author(s): 
Snelling, Paul C.
Publication Title: 
Transfusion Medicine (Oxford, England)

Why do people donate blood? Altruism is the common answer. However, altruism is a complex construct and to answer this question requires a systematic analysis of the insights from the biology, economics and psychology of altruism. I term this the mechanism of altruism (MOA) approach and apply it here for understanding blood donor motivation. The answer also has enormous implications for the type of interventions we choose to adopt as a society.

Author(s): 
Ferguson, E.
Publication Title: 
Transfusion Clinique Et Biologique: Journal De La Societe Francaise De Transfusion Sanguine

In order to answer to its aim of standardised self-sufficiency, the …tablissement franÁais du sang (main French national platform for blood donation) needs to know well the donors, what moves them, what motivates them, and the meaning that they give to their action. This knowledge allows the EFS to better understand the different sensitivities among donors, and therefore to improve the strategy regarding loyalty or/and newcomers. In this paper we follow, without attempting to be fully exhaustive, the evolution of the research regarding blood donation.

Author(s): 
Loquier, B.
Zegierman, A.
Pelletier, B.
Publication Title: 
Transfusion

In an attempt to gain insight into the motivations of blood donors and nondonors, two paper and pencil questionnaires were developed and mailed to approximately 7,000 individuals. In response, 1,429 nondonors and 200 donors completed and returned usable questionnaires. Among donors, awareness of the need for blood, altruism, and investment for the future (blood credit) were the chief motivating factors. Among nondonors the major deterrent was belief in medical disqualification.

Author(s): 
Leibrecht, B. C.
Hogan, J. M.
Luz, G. A.
Tobias, K. I.
Publication Title: 
Transfusion

Sixty English-language articles on the motivation and recruitment of blood donors and nondonors are reviewed and evaluated. Apparently researchers have been finding essentially the same results for approximately twenty years. Motivations to donate are: altruism/humanitarian, personal or family credit, social pressure, replacement and reward. Motivations not to donate are: fear (of needle, sight of blood, weakness, finger or ear pricking), medical excuses, reactions, apathy, and inconvenience.

Author(s): 
Oswalt, R. M.
Publication Title: 
Health and Social Service Journal

Thanks to increased publicity, many people are aware of, and sympathetic to, the need for kidney donors. Dr Barbara Lewis of the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology describes her own survey in which she investigated how attitudes to organ donorship have changed in recent years and whether blood donors feel differently to the general public.

Author(s): 
Lewis, B.

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