Blood Pressure

Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: To introduce research that presents scientific evidence regarding the effects of mantra and mindfulness meditation techniques and yoga on decreasing blood pressure (BP) in patients who have hypertension.

Author(s): 
Park, Seong-Hi
Han, Kuem Sun
Publication Title: 
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine: eCAM

There is growing evidence that yoga may offer a safe and cost-effective intervention for Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (DM 2). However, systematic reviews are lacking. This article critically reviews the published literature regarding the effects of yoga-based programs on physiologic and anthropometric risk profiles and related clinical outcomes in adults with DM 2. We performed a comprehensive literature search using four computerized English and Indian scientific databases.

Author(s): 
Innes, Kim E.
Vincent, Heather K.
Publication Title: 
Holistic Nursing Practice

The aim of this article was to present a evidence-based integrative research review that validates yoga therapy as an effective complementary treatment in the management of high blood pressure (BP). The article also uses the theoretical framework of Dr Hans Selye's general adaptation syndrome. Yoga researchers demonstrate that yoga works because it modulates the physiological system of the body, specifically its effect on the heart rate.

Author(s): 
Okonta, Nkechi Rose
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Hypertension

BACKGROUND: The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendation for yoga as a therapeutic means in the management of prehypertension and hypertension. METHODS: MEDLINE/Pubmed, Scopus, CENTRAL, and IndMED were screened through February 2014 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effects of yoga interventions (?8 weeks) compared with usual care or any active control intervention on blood pressure in patients with prehypertension (120-139/80-89 mm Hg) or hypertension (?140/?90 mm Hg).

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Haller, Heidemarie
Lauche, Romy
Steckhan, Nico
Michalsen, Andreas
Dobos, Gustav
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

Lifestyle modification is a cornerstone of hypertension (HPT) treatment, yet most recommendations currently focus on diet and exercise and do not consider stress reduction strategies. Yoga is a spiritual path that may reduce blood pressure (BP) through reducing stress, increasing parasympathetic activation, and altering baroreceptor sensitivity; however, despite reviews on yoga and cardiovascular disease, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and anxiety that suggest yoga may reduce BP, no comprehensive review has yet focused on yoga and HPT.

Author(s): 
Tyagi, Anupama
Cohen, Marc
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: A sedentary lifestyle and stress are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Since yoga involves exercise and is thought to help in stress reduction it may be an effective strategy in the primary prevention of CVD. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of any type of yoga on the primary prevention of CVD.

Author(s): 
Hartley, Louise
Dyakova, Mariana
Holmes, Jennifer
Clarke, Aileen
Lee, Myeong Soo
Ernst, Edzard
Rees, Karen
Publication Title: 
The American Psychologist

The authors review evidence regarding the biological processes that may link religiosity/spirituality to health. A growing body of observational evidence supports the hypothesis that links religiosity/spirituality to physiological processes. Although much of the earliest evidence came from cross-sectional studies with questionable generalizability and potential confounding, more recent research, with more representative samples and multivariate analysis, provides stronger evidence linking Judeo-Christian religious practices to blood pressure and immune function.

Author(s): 
Seeman, Teresa E.
Dubin, Linda Fagan
Seeman, Melvin
Publication Title: 
Journal of Hypertension

OBJECTIVE: To carry out an independent, systematic review of randomized clinical trials of Transcendental Meditation (TM) for cumulative effects on blood pressure. METHOD: Searches were made of electronic databases and the collected papers and official web sites of the TM organization. We included only randomized clinical trials, without confounding co-interventions, which measured the cumulative effects of TM on blood pressure. RESULTS: Six trials met the inclusion criteria but one, reported only in abstract form, could not be evaluated.

Author(s): 
Canter, Peter H.
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Hypertension

BACKGROUND: Prior clinical trials suggest that the Transcendental Meditation technique may decrease blood pressure of normotensive and hypertensive individuals but study-quality issues have been raised. This study was designed to assess effects of Transcendental Meditation on blood pressure using objective quality assessments and meta-analyses. METHODS: PubMed and Cochrane databases through December 2006 and collected publications on Transcendental Meditation were searched.

Author(s): 
Anderson, James W.
Liu, Chunxu
Kryscio, Richard J.
Publication Title: 
Current Hypertension Reports

Substantial evidence indicates that psychosocial stress contributes to hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Previous meta-analyses of stress reduction and high blood pressure (BP) were outdated and/or methodologically limited. Therefore, we conducted an updated systematic review of the published literature and identified 107 studies on stress reduction and BP. Seventeen trials with 23 treatment comparisons and 960 participants with elevated BP met criteria for well-designed randomized controlled trials and were replicated within intervention categories.

Author(s): 
Rainforth, Maxwell V.
Schneider, Robert H.
Nidich, Sanford I.
Gaylord-King, Carolyn
Salerno, John W.
Anderson, James W.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Blood Pressure