Bloodletting

Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: There has be a large body of evidence on the pharmacological treatments for psoriasis, but whether nonpharmacological interventions are effective in managing psoriasis remains largely unclear. This systematic review conducted pairwise and network meta-analyses to determine the effects of acupuncture-related techniques on acupoint stimulation for the treatment of psoriasis and to determine the order of effectiveness of these remedies.

Author(s): 
Yeh, Mei-Ling
Ko, Shu-Hua
Wang, Mei-Hua
Chi, Ching-Chi
Chung, Yu-Chu
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

BACKGROUND: Wet cupping is a traditional Chinese medicine therapy commonly used in treating herpes zoster in China, and clinical studies have shown that wet cupping may have beneficial effect on herpes zoster compared with Western medication. METHODS: We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on wet cupping for herpes zoster. We searched PubMed, the Cochrane Library (Issue 3, 2008), China Network Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Scientific Journals Fulltext Database VIP, and Wan Fang Database. All searches ended in February 2009.

Author(s): 
Cao, Huijuan
Zhu, Chenjun
Liu, Jianping
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

Blood-letting therapy is one of the most important treatments in traditional Mongolian medicine (TMM). To observe the practice of Mongolian traditional-style blood-letting therapy (MTSBLT), two TMM clinics in Mongolia were visited in 2012 and two practitioners and a patient were interviewed. The interviews provided information on several characteristic features of MTSBLT, including its three stages: preparation, blood-letting, and recuperation.

Author(s): 
Kim, Tae-Hun
Jung, So-Young
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

BACKGROUND: Wet cupping is a traditional Chinese medicine therapy commonly used in treating herpes zoster in China, and clinical studies have shown that wet cupping may have beneficial effect on herpes zoster compared with Western medication. METHODS: We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on wet cupping for herpes zoster. We searched PubMed, the Cochrane Library (Issue 3, 2008), China Network Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Scientific Journals Fulltext Database VIP, and Wan Fang Database. All searches ended in February 2009.

Author(s): 
Cao, Huijuan
Zhu, Chenjun
Liu, Jianping
Publication Title: 
Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao = Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine

Bloodletting therapy is one of the typical treatment modes of traditional Chinese medicine, and acute soft tissue injury (ASTI) is one of the most common indications for acupuncture therapeutics. In this paper, the current situation of treatments and pathological mechanisms of ASTIs, the existing problems of bloodletting therapy in the treatment of ASTIs and the study strategies are systematically analyzed, indicating that bloodletting therapy is significantly effective in the treatment of ASTIs.

Author(s): 
Chen, Peng-dian
Chen, Gui-Zhen
Xu, Yun-Xiang
Publication Title: 
Alternative Medicine Review: A Journal of Clinical Therapeutic

INTRODUCTION: Our objective was to determine whether a three-week complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) approach integrating several therapies from Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) along with neural therapy (injection of 1% procaine as local anesthesia) reduces the level of unresolved pain associated with herpes zoster. METHODS: The design was a randomized controlled clinical trial in a community-based primary care clinic in Toronto, Ontario.

Author(s): 
Hui, Fred
Boyle, Eleanor
Vayda, Eugene
Glazier, Richard H.
Publication Title: 
Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England

Bleeding and cupping have been used in medicine since ancient times in the treatment of fevers and local inflammatory disorders. Local bleeding, by 'wet cupping', was effected by a scarificator or by leeches. John Hunter recommended venesection in moderation but preferred leeches for local bleeding. Bleeding as an accepted therapeutic practice went out of vogue in the middle of the nineteenth century as a result of the introduction of modern scientific methods. Dry cupping and the use of leeches, as counter irritants, persisted until the middle of this century.

Author(s): 
Turk, J. L.
Allen, E.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine = Chung I Tsa Chih Ying Wen Pan / Sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine
Author(s): 
Hu, Chengyou
Publication Title: 
Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine = Chung I Tsa Chih Ying Wen Pan / Sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine
Author(s): 
Dong, Jianping
Xu, Yueze
Zhang, Qingli
Publication Title: 
Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine = Chung I Tsa Chih Ying Wen Pan / Sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of blood-letting puncture at Twelve Well-Points of Hand on consciousness and heart rate in patients with early apoplexy. METHOD: Under observation were patients with disturbance of consciousness within 3 days after the apoplectic seizure. The patients were divided into a large injury team, a moderate injury team and a mild injury team. Each team was again randomly divided into a puncture group and a control group, with routine treatment in both groups but blood-letting puncture only in the puncture group.

Author(s): 
Yi, Guo
Xiuyun, Wang
Tangping, Xu
Zhihua, Dai
Yunchen, Li

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