Bone Density

Publication Title: 
Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao = Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine

BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a kind of chronic autoimmune disease and osteoporosis is one of its complications. OBJECTIVE: To explore the effects of Qianggu Capsule, a compound traditional Chinese herbal medicine, on bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis in patients with RA.

Author(s): 
Ouyang, Gui-lin
Feng, Xiao-hui
Xiao, Lian-bo
Huang, Zheng
Xia, Qing
Zhu, Fei
Publication Title: 
Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America

In summary, the optimal model for the prevention of osteoporotic fractures includes maximization and maintenance of bone strength and minimization of trauma. Numerous determinants of each have been identified, but further work to develop preventative strategies based on these determinants remains to be undertaken. Physical activity is a determinant of peak BMD. There also is evidence that activity during growth modulates the external geometry and trabecular architecture, potentially enhancing skeletal strength, while during the adult years activity may reduce age-related bone loss.

Author(s): 
Henderson, N. K.
White, C. P.
Eisman, J. A.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

The most common metabolic bone disorder is osteoporosis, which affects 25 million Americans, of whom 80% are women. Bone loss in women occurs most commonly after menopause, when the rate of loss may be as high as 2% per year. Bone mass can be determined with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. The rate of active loss can be assayed by the detection of bone collagen breakdown products (e.g., N-telopeptide, pyridinoline) in the urine. Although it has been suggested that white women are most commonly affected, Hispanic and Asian women are also affected.

Author(s): 
Lane, J. M.
Nydick, M.
Publication Title: 
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the potential benefits of regular Tai Chi Chuan exercise on the weight-bearing bones of postmenopausal women. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: University medical school in Hong Kong. PARTICIPANTS: Postmenopausal women (age range, 50-59y), including 17 self-selected regular Tai Chi Chuan exercisers (TCE) with over 4 years of regular exercise, and 17 age- and gender-matched nonexercising controls (CON). INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable.

Author(s): 
Qin, Ling
Au, Szeki
Choy, Wingyee
Leung, Pingchung
Neff, Marus
Lee, Kwongman
Lau, Mingchu
Woo, Jean
Chan, Kaiming
Publication Title: 
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the potential benefits of programmed Tai Chi Chun (TCC) exercise on the weight-bearing bones of early postmenopausal women. DESIGN: Age-matched and randomized prospective intervention. SETTING: University medical school. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred thirty-two healthy postmenopausal women (mean age, 54.0+/-3.5y) within 10 years of menopause onset were recruited and randomized into the TCC exercise group (n=67) or the sedentary control group (n=65).

Author(s): 
Chan, Kaiming
Qin, Ling
Lau, Mingchu
Woo, Jean
Au, Szeki
Choy, Wingyee
Lee, Kwongman
Lee, Shiuhung
Publication Title: 
Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism

This study was performed to evaluate the potential benefits of regular Tai Chi Chun (TCC) exercise on bone mineral density (BMD) and neuromuscular function in postmenopausal women. In this cross-sectional study, 99 healthy postmenopausal women, with a mean age of 55.9+/-3.1 years and within 10 years after the menopause, were recruited; including 48 subjects who had been regularly practicing TCC exercise for more than 3 h/week and 51 age- and sex-matched sedentary controls (CON).

Author(s): 
Qin, Ling
Choy, Wingyee
Leung, Kwoksui
Leung, Ping Chung
Au, Szeki
Hung, Wingyin
Dambacher, Maximilian
Chan, Kaiming
Publication Title: 
Age and Ageing

BACKGROUND: The beneficial role of exercise in improving bone mineral density, muscle strength and balance, has been documented predominantly in younger populations. These findings may not apply to elderly populations with limited ability to perform exercises of high intensity. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of Tai Chi (TC) and resistance exercise (RTE) on bone mineral density (BMD), muscle strength, balance and flexibility in community living elderly people. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial, using blocked randomization with stratification by sex.

Author(s): 
Woo, Jean
Hong, Athena
Lau, Edith
Lynn, Henry
Publication Title: 
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the evidence for Tai Chi as an intervention to reduce rate of bone loss in postmenopausal women. DATA SOURCES: Literature search using Medline, Science Citation Index, Cochrane databases, China Biological Medicine Database, and additional manual reference searches of retrieved articles and personal libraries. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), prospective cohort studies, and cross-sectional studies that included Tai Chi as an intervention, and had at least 1 outcome related to measurement of bone mineral density (BMD).

Author(s): 
Wayne, Peter M.
Kiel, Douglas P.
Krebs, David E.
Davis, Roger B.
Savetsky-German, Jacqueline
Connelly, Maureen
Buring, Julie E.
Publication Title: 
Osteoporosis international: a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA

INTRODUCTION: Tai chi may have beneficial effects with respect to balance, falls and non-vertebral fractures. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate evidence from controlled clinical trials testing the effectiveness of tai chi for osteoporosis. METHODS: Systematic searches were conducted on 20 electronic databases. The outcome measures considered for inclusion were changes in bone parameters. RESULTS: Five randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and two controlled clinical trials (CCT) met all inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Lee, M. S.
Pittler, M. H.
Shin, B.-C.
Ernst, E.
Publication Title: 
Clinics in Sports Medicine

Osteoporosis is a silent, systemic, chronic disease characterized by low bone mass and structural deterioration of bone tissue. Its clinical and public health implications are substantial because of the mortality, morbidity, and medical care cost associated with osteoporotic fractures. Although estrogen-replacement therapy or anti-bone resorptive drugs can prevent postmenopausal bone loss, they also show side effects. Physical activity is an nonpharmacological approach for prevention of osteoporosis.

Author(s): 
Lui, Pauline Po Yee
Qin, Ling
Chan, Kai Ming

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