Bone Marrow Transplantation

Publication Title: 
Oncology Nursing Forum

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To describe and understand the experience of donating bone marrow to a relative. DESIGN: Exploratory, descriptive, and qualitative. SETTING: An urban comprehensive cancer center. SAMPLE: Twelve donors were interviewed--eight women and four men. The average age was 47, and the average length of time since donation was nine months. At the time of the interview, seven recipients were living and five had died. METHODS: Open-ended, face-to-face, or telephone interviews were conducted within one year of bone marrow donation using an interview guide.

Author(s): 
Christopher, K. A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health and Social Behavior

This study investigated the self-image of individuals who donate bone marrow to strangers as part of the National Marrow Donor Program. Quantitative surveys were administered to donors before donating (N = 849), shortly after donating (N = 754), and a year after donating (N = 370). In addition, 52 donors were interviewed in-depth by telephone at the same three points in time. Many of these donors felt that by donating bone marrow they were actualizing a central trait in their identity.

Author(s): 
Simmons, R. G.
Schimmel, M.
Butterworth, V. A.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

This paper presents a qualitative perspective of the Chinese experience of unrelated bone marrow donation. A total population of 37 Chinese men and women, residing in Hong Kong who had donated bone marrow to an unrelated recipient were interviewed and asked their retrospective perceptions and experiences during the process of unrelated bone marrow donation. The majority was female (60%) and single (59.3%). The median age was 30.9 years.

Author(s): 
Holroyd, E.
Molassiotis, A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Economics

Many U.S. states have passed legislation providing leave to organ and bone marrow donors and/or tax benefits for live and deceased organ and bone marrow donations and to employers of donors. We exploit cross-state variation in the timing of such legislation to analyze its impact on organ donations by living and deceased persons, on measures of the quality of the transplants, and on the number of bone marrow donations. We find that these provisions do not have a significant impact on the quantity of organs donated.

Author(s): 
Lacetera, Nicola
Macis, Mario
Stith, Sarah S.
Publication Title: 
Transfusion

Annually, over 3000 bone marrow transplants are performed worldwide involving HLA-identical sibling donors. However, only 30 percent of those patients who need a bone marrow transplant have a matched sibling donor. Programs have been developed to provide volunteer unrelated bone marrow donors for patients without sibling donors. Because bone marrow donation requires a high level of altruism, especially on the part of a donor unrelated to the patient, it is important to determine the effect of donation on the donor.

Author(s): 
Stroncek, D.
Strand, R.
Scott, E.
Kamstra-Halvorson, L.
Halagan, N.
Rogers, G.
McCullough, J.
Publication Title: 
Omega

This article examines the responses of bone marrow donors to the death of the unrelated person to whom they donated. Data analyzed were 330 questionnaires and fifty in-depth interviews collected from donors in the National Marrow Donor Program at one year post-donation. Death of the recipient produced feelings of guilt and responsibility in the donors in only a few cases (2% of donors from questionnaire data and 2 of the 23 donors interviewed). Grief occurred often (22 of 23 donors interviewed) and was often surprisingly intense, given the fact that the recipient was a stranger.

Author(s): 
Butterworth, V. A.
Simmons, R. G.
Schimmel, M.
Publication Title: 
Bone Marrow Transplantation

The attitudes of 463 potential bone marrow donors toward blood donation, kidney donation in life, organ donation after death, autopsy, and donation of the whole body for anatomic dissection were surveyed, using a questionnaire that had previously been employed for assessing the attitudes of the public. The response rate was 96%. Three quarters of the respondents were blood donors and recruited via the blood center. The proportion that accepted the procedures varied between 24% for anatomic dissection and 97% for autopsy.

Author(s): 
Sanner, M. A.
Publication Title: 
British Medical Bulletin

As organ transplantation is physically possible within a tension between common biological properties and individual immunities, so it is ethically possible within a tension between individual personality in full integrity and the human community of which each member, social by nature, is an organic part. Ethical donation is by consent, explicit or presumed, spontaneously offered or procured by request. Altruism or commercial dealing is now a live issue in organ procurement, whether cadaveric or by live donation, related or unrelated.

Author(s): 
Dunstan, G. R.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

This paper presents a qualitative perspective of the Chinese experience of unrelated bone marrow donation. A total population of 37 Chinese men and women, residing in Hong Kong who had donated bone marrow to an unrelated recipient were interviewed and asked their retrospective perceptions and experiences during the process of unrelated bone marrow donation. The majority was female (60%) and single (59.3%). The median age was 30.9 years.

Author(s): 
Holroyd, E.
Molassiotis, A.
Publication Title: 
Boston College Law Review. Boston College. Law School

Organ transplants may offer the best hope of long term survival for individuals afflicted with certain cancers or other debilitating diseases. The hope that a transplant may inspire in an organ recipient should not, however, be the determinative factor when the proposed source of the organ is incompetent. Competent adults are not compelled to act altruistically by undergoing a surgical invasion for the benefit of third parties. Children and mentally incompetent adults should likewise be protected from such compelled altruism.

Author(s): 
Cheyette, C.

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