Breathing Exercises

Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

BACKGROUND: A comprehensive, but not systematic, review of the research on complementary and alternative treatments, specifically mind/body techniques, on musculoskeletal disease was conducted at Stanford University. The goals of the review were to establish a comprehensive literature review and provide a rationale for future research carrying the theme of "successful aging." METHODS: Computerized searches were conducted using MEDLINE, PsychInfo, Stanford Library, Dissertation Abstracts, Lexus-Nexus, the Internet as well as interviews conducted with practitioners and the elderly.

Author(s): 
Luskin, F. M.
Newell, K. A.
Griffith, M.
Holmes, M.
Telles, S.
DiNucci, E.
Marvasti, F. F.
Hill, M.
Pelletier, K. R.
Haskell, W. L.
Publication Title: 
Swiss Medical Weekly

OBJECTIVE: An increasing number of patients with asthma are attracted by complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Therefore, it is of importance that scientific evidence about the efficacy of this type of therapy is regarded. METHOD: We searched the electronic databases Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library for controlled trials and systematic reviews to evaluate the evidence of the most popular alternative therapies, i.e. acupuncture, homeopathy, breathing techniques, herbal and nutritional therapies.

Author(s): 
Steurer-Stey, Claudia
Russi, Erich W.
Steurer, Johann
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To provide a descriptive overview of the clinical trials assessing meditation practices for health care. DESIGN: Systematic review of the literature. Comprehensive searches were conducted in 17 electronic bibliographic databases through September 2005. Other sources of potentially relevant studies included hand searches, reference tracking, contacting experts, and gray literature searches. Included studies were clinical trials with 10 or more adult participants using any meditation practice, providing quantitative data on health-related outcomes, and published in English.

Author(s): 
Ospina, Maria B.
Bond, Kenneth
Karkhaneh, Mohammad
Buscemi, Nina
Dryden, Donna M.
Barnes, Vernon
Carlson, Linda E.
Dusek, Jeffery A.
Shannahoff-Khalsa, David
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Dysfunctional breathing/hyperventilation syndrome (DB/HVS) is a respiratory disorder, psychologically or physiologically based, involving breathing too deeply and/or too rapidly (hyperventilation) or erratic breathing interspersed with breath-holding or sighing (DB). DB/HVS can result in significant patient morbidity and an array of symptoms including breathlessness, chest tightness, dizziness, tremor and paraesthesia.

Author(s): 
Jones, Mandy
Harvey, Alex
Marston, Louise
O'Connell, Neil E.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Dysfunctional breathing is described as chronic or recurrent changes in breathing pattern causing respiratory and non-respiratory symptoms. It is an umbrella term that encompasses hyperventilation syndrome and vocal cord dysfunction. Dysfunctional breathing affects 10% of the general population. Symptoms include dyspnoea, chest tightness, sighing and chest pain which arise secondary to alterations in respiratory pattern and rate. Little is known about dysfunctional breathing in children.

Author(s): 
Barker, Nicola J.
Jones, Mandy
O'Connell, Neil E.
Everard, Mark L.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: People with cancer undergoing active treatment experience numerous disease- and treatment-related adverse outcomes and poorer health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Exercise interventions are hypothesized to alleviate these adverse outcomes. HRQoL and its domains are important measures of cancer survivorship, both during and after the end of active treatment for cancer. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise on overall HRQoL outcomes and specific HRQoL domains among adults with cancer during active treatment.

Author(s): 
Mishra, Shiraz I.
Scherer, Roberta W.
Snyder, Claire
Geigle, Paula M.
Berlanstein, Debra R.
Topaloglu, Ozlem
Publication Title: 
Oncology Nursing Forum

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise interventions on overall health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its domains among cancer survivors who have completed primary treatment. DATA SOURCES: 11 electronic databases were searched from inception (dates varied) to October 2011. The authors also identified eligible trials through a search of additional sources. DATA SYNTHESIS: 40 trials with 3,694 participants met the inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Mishra, Shiraz I.
Scherer, Roberta W.
Snyder, Claire
Geigle, Paula
Gotay, Carolyn
Publication Title: 
Rheumatology International

A systematic review with meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of meditative movement therapies (Qigong, Tai Chi and Yoga) in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) was carried out. We screened Clinicaltrials.Gov, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, PubMed and Scopus (through December 2010) and the reference sections of original studies for meditative movement therapies (MMT) in FMS. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing MMT to controls were analysed. Outcomes of efficacy were pain, sleep, fatigue, depression and health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

Author(s): 
Langhorst, Jost
Klose, Petra
Dobos, Gustav J.
Bernardy, Kathrin
Häuser, Winfried
Publication Title: 
Respiratory Care

BACKGROUND: Meditative movement, such as tai chi, yoga, and qi gong, may benefit people with cystic fibrosis (CF), as a form of gentle exercise incorporating meditation, breathing, and relaxation. Respiratory function is the most common issue in CF. In this systematic review we synthesized the evidence on the effect of meditative movement on respiratory function in patients with CF. METHODS: We searched Chinese and English language databases with terms relating to tai chi/yoga/qi gong, and respiratory function/cough/dyspnea. Articles were screened and selected by 2 researchers.

Author(s): 
Lorenc, Ava B.
Wang, Yuyi
Madge, Susan L.
Hu, Xiaoyang
Mian, Awais M.
Robinson, Nicola
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: Yoga is a popular form of exercise in the Western world, and yoga's effects on pulmonary function have been investigated previously. The purpose of this article is to review this research systematically and determine if regular yoga training improves pulmonary function in apparently healthy individuals. METHODS: Using the Alternative Health Watch, the Physical Education Index, Medline,(®) and the SPORTdiscus databases; and the keywords yoga, respiration, and pulmonary function, a comprehensive search was conducted that yielded 57 studies.

Author(s): 
Abel, Allison N.
Lloyd, Lisa K.
Williams, James S.

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