Breathing

Publication Title: 
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine: eCAM

Family and friends who provide unpaid care to an individual with a disease or disability (known as informal caregivers) experience numerous threats to their physical health as a result of providing care. In spite of evidence that participation in physical and leisure activities can be health promoting, informal caregivers have reported diminished or completely absent leisure participation. Hatha yoga has documented therapeutic benefits, including reduced anxiety, as well as improved muscle strength and endurance and flexibility.

Author(s): 
Van Puymbroeck, Marieke
Payne, Laura L.
Hsieh, Pei-Chun
Publication Title: 
The National Medical Journal of India

BACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) enjoys widespread popularity in chronic illnesses such as rheumatic diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the commonest inflammatory joint disease seen in clinical practice. No systematic study on the use of CAM by patients with RA is available from northern India. METHODS: We evaluated the prevalence and usage characteristics of CAM in Indian patients with RA using a questionnaire at a tertiary care centre in northern India. RESULTS: Of the 102 patients with RA included in the study, 39% reported current CAM use.

Author(s): 
Zaman, Tarique
Agarwal, Shikhar
Handa, Rohini
Publication Title: 
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing

Although yoga has been practiced in Eastern culture for thousands of years as part of life philosophy, classes in the United States only recently have been offered to people with cancer. The word yoga is derived from the Sanskrit root yuj, meaning to bind, join, and yoke. This reflection of the union of the body, mind, and spirit is what differentiates yoga from general exercise programs. Yoga classes in the United States generally consist of asanas (postures), which are designed to exercise every muscle, nerve, and gland in the body.

Author(s): 
DiStasio, Susan A.
Publication Title: 
Consciousness and Cognition

Here we report that a specific form of yoga can generate controlled high-frequency gamma waves. For the first time, paroxysmal gamma waves (PGW) were observed in eight subjects practicing a yoga technique of breathing control called Bhramari Pranayama (BhPr). To obtain new insights into the nature of the EEG during BhPr, we analyzed EEG signals using time-frequency representations (TFR), independent component analysis (ICA), and EEG tomography (LORETA). We found that the PGW consists of high-frequency biphasic ripples.

Author(s): 
Vialatte, François B.
Bakardjian, Hovagim
Prasad, Rajkishore
Cichocki, Andrzej
Publication Title: 
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback

The novelty of this study was to investigate the changes in cardiorespiratory and metabolic intensity brought about by the practice of pranayamas (breathing exercises of yoga) and meditation during the same hatha-yoga session. The technique applied was the one advocated by the hatha-yoga system. Nine yoga instructors-five females and four males, mean age of 44+/-11, 6, were subjected to analysis of the gases expired during three distinct periods of 30 min: rest, respiratory exercises and meditative practice.

Author(s): 
Danucalov, Marcello Arias Dias
Simões, Roberto Serafim
Kozasa, Elisa Harumi
Leite, José Roberto
Publication Title: 
Menopause (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of yoga on the climacteric symptoms, perceived stress, and personality in perimenopausal women. DESIGN: One hundred twenty participants (ages 40-55 y) were randomly divided into two study arms, ie, yoga and control. The yoga group practiced an integrated approach to yoga therapy comprising surya namaskara (sun salutation) with 12 postures, pranayama (breathing practices), and avartan dhyan (cyclic meditation), whereas the control group practiced a set of simple physical exercises under supervision of trained teachers for 8 weeks (1 h daily, 5 days per week).

Author(s): 
Chattha, Ritu
Raghuram, Nagarathna
Venkatram, Padmalatha
Hongasandra, Nagendra R.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Yoga

OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of yoga on verbal aggressiveness in normal healthy adults. METHODS: Of the 1228 persons who attended introductory lectures, 226 subjects of both sexes who satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria and who consented to participate in the study were randomly allocated into two groups. These 226 subjects were between the ages of 17 and 62 years and 173/226 completed the eight weeks of intervention. The Yoga (Y) group practised an integrated yoga module that included asanas, pranayama, meditation, notional correction, and devotional sessions.

Author(s): 
Deshpande, Sudheer
Nagendra, H. R.
Raghuram, Nagarathna
Publication Title: 
Nepal Medical College journal: NMCJ

Pranayama (breathing exercise), one of the yogic techniques can produce different physiological responses in healthy individuals. The responses of Alternate Nostril Breathing (ANB) the Nadisudhi Pranayama on some cardio-respiratory functions were investigated in healthy young adults. The subjects performed ANB exercise (15 minutes everyday in the morning) for four weeks. Cardio-respiratory parameters were recorded before and after 4-weeks training period. A significant increment in Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR L/min) and Pulse pressure (PP) was noted.

Author(s): 
Upadhyay Dhungel, K.
Malhotra, V.
Sarkar, D.
Prajapati, R.
Publication Title: 
Indian journal of clinical biochemistry: IJCB

A distinguishable feature of type 2 diabetes besides hyperglycemia and deranged lipid profile is an impaired insulin secretion, peripheral insulin resistance and obesity which has become a major health concern worldwide. India with an estimated 31million diabetics in 2000 and 79mllions by the yr 2030 has the highest number of type 2 diabetics in the world. In this study, we aimed to see if yoga-asanas and pranayamas have any influence in modifying certain biochemical parameters.

Author(s): 
Singh, Savita
Kyizom, Tenzin
Singh, K. P.
Tandon, O. P.
Madhu, S. V.
Publication Title: 
Psychological Reports

Siddha Samadhi Yoga is a program in which meditation is associated with pranayama (breathing exercises). 22 volunteers with anxiety complaints (M age = 42.8 yr., SD = 10.3) were assigned to two groups: 14 attended the yoga group, and 8 attended a waiting-list or control group. They were evaluated before the intervention and 1 month after it on the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, Tension Feelings Self-evaluation Scales, and the Well-being Self-evaluation Scales.

Author(s): 
Kozasa, Elisa Harumi
Santos, Ruth Ferreira
Rueda, Adriana Dourado
Benedito-Silva, Ana Amélia
De Ornellas, Felipe Leite Moraes
Leite, José Roberto

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