Bromelains

Publication Title: 
The Journal of Laryngology and Otology

OBJECTIVE: To assess the evidence surrounding the use of certain complementary supplements in otolaryngology. We specifically focussed on four commonly used supplements: spirulina, Ginkgo biloba, Vertigoheel and nutritional supplements (cod liver oil, multivitamins and pineapple enzyme). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review of the English and foreign language literature. INCLUSION CRITERIA: in vivo human studies. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: animal trials, in vitro studies and case reports.

Author(s): 
Karkos, P. D.
Leong, S. C.
Arya, A. K.
Papouliakos, S. M.
Apostolidou, M. T.
Issing, W. J.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Laryngology and Otology

OBJECTIVE: To assess the evidence surrounding the use of certain complementary supplements in otolaryngology. We specifically focussed on four commonly used supplements: spirulina, Ginkgo biloba, Vertigoheel and nutritional supplements (cod liver oil, multivitamins and pineapple enzyme). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review of the English and foreign language literature. INCLUSION CRITERIA: in vivo human studies. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: animal trials, in vitro studies and case reports.

Author(s): 
Karkos, P. D.
Leong, S. C.
Arya, A. K.
Papouliakos, S. M.
Apostolidou, M. T.
Issing, W. J.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Laryngology and Otology

OBJECTIVE: To assess the evidence surrounding the use of certain complementary supplements in otolaryngology. We specifically focussed on four commonly used supplements: spirulina, Ginkgo biloba, Vertigoheel and nutritional supplements (cod liver oil, multivitamins and pineapple enzyme). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review of the English and foreign language literature. INCLUSION CRITERIA: in vivo human studies. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: animal trials, in vitro studies and case reports.

Author(s): 
Karkos, P. D.
Leong, S. C.
Arya, A. K.
Papouliakos, S. M.
Apostolidou, M. T.
Issing, W. J.
Publication Title: 
Cellular Immunology

OBJECTIVE: Bromelain, a clinically used pineapple extract and natural product, has reported anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of bromelain treatment in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine model of allergic airway disease (AAD). METHODS: To establish AAD, mice were sensitized with intraperitoneal (i.p.) OVA/alum and challenged with daily OVA aerosols. Mice were treated i.p. with either saline, 2 or 6 mg/kg bromelain, twice daily for four consecutive days.

Author(s): 
Secor, Eric R.
Carson, William F.
Cloutier, Michelle M.
Guernsey, Linda A.
Schramm, Craig M.
Wu, Carol A.
Thrall, Roger S.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Immunology (Orlando, Fla.)

Oral bromelain has been anecdotally reported to decrease inflammation in ulcerative colitis (UC). Proteolytically active bromelain is known to decrease expression of mRNAs encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines by human leukocytes in vitro. To assess the effect of bromelain on mucosal secretion of cytokines in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), endoscopic colon biopsies from patients with UC, Crohn's disease (CD), and non-IBD controls were treated in vitro with bromelain or media, then cultured. Secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines was measured.

Author(s): 
Onken, Jane E.
Greer, Paula K.
Calingaert, Brian
Hale, Laura P.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology

Bromelain (Br), a proteolytic enzyme extracted from the stem of the pineapple, is known to possess anti-inflammatory activity and has been shown to reduce blood viscosity, prevent the aggregation of blood platelets, and improve ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in a skeletal muscle model. We investigated the capacity of Br to limit myocardial injury in a global I/R model. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: control (PBS) and Br at 10 mg/kg in PBS administered via intraperitoneal injection (twice/day) for 15 consecutive days.

Author(s): 
Juhasz, Bela
Thirunavukkarasu, Mahesh
Pant, Rima
Zhan, Lijun
Penumathsa, Suresh Varma
Secor, Eric R.
Srivastava, Sapna
Raychaudhuri, Utpal
Menon, Venugopal P.
Otani, Hajime
Thrall, Roger S.
Maulik, Nilanjana
Publication Title: 
Clinical Immunology (Orlando, Fla.)

Bromelain, a mixture of proteases derived from pineapple stem, has been reported to have therapeutic benefits in a variety of inflammatory diseases, including murine inflammatory bowel disease. The purpose of this work was to understand potential mechanisms for this anti-inflammatory activity. Exposure to bromelain in vitro has been shown to remove a number of cell surface molecules that are vital to leukocyte trafficking, including CD128a/CXCR1 and CD128b/CXCR2 that serve as receptors for the neutrophil chemoattractant IL-8 and its murine homologues.

Author(s): 
Fitzhugh, David J.
Shan, Siqing
Dewhirst, Mark W.
Hale, Laura P.
Publication Title: 
International Immunopharmacology

Bromelain (Br), an extract from pineapple stem with cysteine protease activity, exerts anti-inflammatory effects in a number of inflammatory models. We have previously shown that Br treatment decreased activated CD4(+) T cells and has a therapeutic role in an ovalbumin-induced murine model of allergic airway disease. The current study was designed to determine the effect of Br on CD4(+) T cell activation, specifically the expression of CD25 in vitro.

Author(s): 
Secor, Eric R.
Singh, Anurag
Guernsey, Linda A.
McNamara, Jeff T.
Zhan, Lijun
Maulik, Nilanjana
Thrall, Roger S.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

Stem bromelain, a cysteine protease isolated from pineapples, is a natural anti-inflammatory treatment, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Curious as to whether bromelain might affect selectin-mediated leukocyte rolling, we studied the ability of bromelain-treated human neutrophils to tether to substrates presenting immobilized P-selectin or E-selectin under shear stress. Bromelain treatment attenuated P-selectin-mediated tethering but had no effect on neutrophil recruitment on E-selectin substrates.

Author(s): 
Banks, Jessica M.
Herman, Christine T.
Bailey, Ryan C.
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