Bronchoconstriction

Publication Title: 
Sports Medicine (Auckland, N.Z.)

BACKGROUND: Although physical exercise is recommended for asthmatics, evidence on the effects of exercise on clinical key factors is still missing. OBJECTIVES: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the effect of exercise training (EXT) on quality of life (QoL), bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), lung function and exercise capacity, plus the factors affecting changes in QoL and exercise capacity in asthmatics after a period of EXT.

Author(s): 
Eichenberger, Philipp A.
Diener, Stephanie N.
Kofmehl, Reto
Spengler, Christina M.
Publication Title: 
Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: Official Publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology

BACKGROUND: Although yoga is frequently used by patients with asthma, its efficacy in alleviating asthma remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: To systematically assess and meta-analyze the available data on efficacy and safety of yoga in alleviating asthma. METHODS: MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PsycINFO, CAM-Quest, CAMbase, and IndMED were searched through January 2014. Randomized controlled trials of yoga for patients with asthma were included if they assessed asthma control, symptoms, quality of life, and/or pulmonary function.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Posadzki, Paul
Dobos, Gustav
Langhorst, Jost
Publication Title: 
Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: Official Publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology

BACKGROUND: Although yoga is frequently used by patients with asthma, its efficacy in alleviating asthma remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: To systematically assess and meta-analyze the available data on efficacy and safety of yoga in alleviating asthma. METHODS: MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PsycINFO, CAM-Quest, CAMbase, and IndMED were searched through January 2014. Randomized controlled trials of yoga for patients with asthma were included if they assessed asthma control, symptoms, quality of life, and/or pulmonary function.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Posadzki, Paul
Dobos, Gustav
Langhorst, Jost
Publication Title: 
Sports Medicine (Auckland, N.Z.)

BACKGROUND: Although physical exercise is recommended for asthmatics, evidence on the effects of exercise on clinical key factors is still missing. OBJECTIVES: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the effect of exercise training (EXT) on quality of life (QoL), bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), lung function and exercise capacity, plus the factors affecting changes in QoL and exercise capacity in asthmatics after a period of EXT.

Author(s): 
Eichenberger, Philipp A.
Diener, Stephanie N.
Kofmehl, Reto
Spengler, Christina M.
Publication Title: 
Blood

Cysteinyl leukotriene (cysLT) overproduction is a hallmark of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), but its mechanism is poorly understood. Because adherent platelets can convert the leukocyte-derived precursor leukotriene (LT)A(4) to LTC(4), the parent cysLT, through the terminal enzyme LTC(4) synthase, we investigated the contribution of platelet-dependent transcellular cysLT production in AERD.

Author(s): 
Laidlaw, Tanya M.
Kidder, Molly S.
Bhattacharyya, Neil
Xing, Wei
Shen, Shiliang
Milne, Ginger L.
Castells, Mariana C.
Chhay, Heng
Boyce, Joshua A.
Publication Title: 
The European Respiratory Journal

The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether Chinese traditional herbal drugs, Gorei-San (TJ-17) and Toki-Shakuyaku-San (TJ-23), affect airway smooth muscle tone and, if so, to determine what the mechanism of action is. Rabbit tracheal segments were isolated and the contractile responses to electrical field stimulation and acetylcholine were measured before and after the application of TJ-17 or TJ-23 under isometric conditions in vitro. Ouabain-sensitive rubidium-86 (86Rb) uptake by tissues in response to each drug was also measured.

Author(s): 
Tagaya, E.
Tamaoki, J.
Kawatani, K.
Taira, M.
Nagai, A.
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Traditional Chinese medicines have been used for anti-asthma treatment for several centuries in many Asian countries, and have been shown to effectively relieve symptoms. Our previous study demonstrated that a complex traditional Chinese medicine (CTCM) administered in nebulized form through the intratracheal route is effective against early-phase air-flow obstruction and can inhibit IL-5 production in ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized guinea pigs. However, the antiasthmatic mechanisms of CTCMs are still unclear.

Author(s): 
Chang, Hung-Chou
Gong, Cheng-Chung
Chan, Chi-Lim
Mak, Oi-Tong
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