Buddhism

Publication Title: 
Studies in Family Planning

This study analyzes the involvement of men in abortion in Vietnam, where induced abortion is legal and abortion rates are among the highest in the world. Twenty men were interviewed in 1996 about the role they played in their wives' abortions and about their feelings and ethical views concerning the procedure. The results showed that both husbands and wives considered the husband to be the main decisionmaker regarding family size, which included the decision to have an abortion, but that, in fact, some women had undergone an abortion without consulting their husbands in advance.

Author(s): 
Johansson, A.
Nga, N. T.
Huy, T. Q.
Dat, D. D.
Holmgren, K.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Psychiatric Nursing Research

The purpose of this study was to examine the religious belief of the elderly women in Hong Kong and how their life satisfaction and depressive symptoms were related to various dimensions of religiosity. Data based on a community sample of older women (N = 180, mean age = 74.2 years) indicated that majority of them (56.7%) reported beliefs in folk religion and ancestor worship. The Catholics and Buddhists appeared to enjoy a better mental health status than did the Protestants, which seemed to be mediated by better family supports and physical health condition.

Author(s): 
Boey, Kam Weng
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy

Chaplains serving in the health care context provide a ministry to dying patients of inestimable worth as they comfort patients in the last chapter of the journey by being present, listening, and caring. Chaplains also play another important role, helping patients clarify ways in which their beliefs and values might influence health care decisions. This paper reviewed the current trends of spiritual diversity alongside the aging of a large Baby Boomer cohort.

Author(s): 
Ai, Amy L.
McCormick, Thomas R.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Religion and Health

The use of psychopharmaceuticals as an enhancement technology has been the focus of attention in the bioethics literature. However, there has been little examination of the challenges that this practice creates for religious traditions that place importance on questions of being, authenticity, and identity. We asked expert commentators from six major world religions to consider the issues raised by psychopharmaceuticals as an enhancement technology.

Author(s): 
Fitzpatrick, Scott J.
Jordens, Christopher F. C.
Kerridge, Ian H.
Keown, Damien
Walter, James J.
Nelson, Paul
Abdalla, Mohamad
Lehmann, Lisa Soleymani
Sarma, Deepak
Publication Title: 
The Journals of Gerontology. Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences

OBJECTIVE: To see whether three dimensions of religion (private religious practices, religious coping, and belief in the afterlife) buffer the effect of the death of a significant other on change in self-reported hypertension over time. METHODS: Interviews were conducted with a nationally representative sample of people aged 60 and older in Japan at two points in time, 1996 and 1999. Complete data were available on 1,723 older Japanese.

Author(s): 
Krause, Neal
Liang, Jersey
Shaw, Benjamin A.
Sugisawa, Hidehiro
Kim, Hye-Kyung
Sugihara, Yoko
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Nursing

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The paper discusses the application of the Eastern body-mind-spirit approach in healthcare practice. BACKGROUND: Traumas, sufferings and losses may induce immense distress in patients and their families, as well as apathy and exhaustion in healthcare workers. Over-specialization and compartmentalization of services may provide a convenient shelter for healthcare workers to be detached and to simply focus on a narrowly defined scope of intervention. However, the existential problems are still there.

Author(s): 
Chan, Cecilia L. W.
Ng, S. M.
Ho, Rainbow T. H.
Chow, Amy Y. M.
Publication Title: 
Health Care for Women International

We explored how Thai female adolescents describe the meaning and context of dating violence. Twenty-four students, aged 15-17, were purposively recruited from a secondary school in Bangkok for individually audio-taped interviews. The interviews lasted 45- 70 minutes. ATLAS ti 5.2 was selected for content analysis. Five themes emerged, including characteristics of adolescent romantic relationships, influences on adolescent romantic relationships, perceptions of dating violence, cycle of dating-violence experiences, and influences on adolescents' perceptions of dating violence.

Author(s): 
Thongpriwan, Vipavee
McElmurry, Beverly J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to experimentally determine whether an unimprinted intention host device (IHD), electrically activated in the near presence of the Maitreya Buddhist relics for about 72 hours (3 nights), could be imprinted by its loving kindness essence into the IHD. This will be referred to as a "first-degree relic IHD." DESIGN: This first-degree relic IHD was placed in an unused, unconditioned room in a Scottsdale, AZ home in the presence of a water vessel (pH ~ 5.6) being continuously monitored via a pH-sensor system that was computer recorded.

Author(s): 
Tiller, William A.
Tiller, Jean E.
Dibble, Walter E.
Manek, Raj
Manek, Nisha
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Psychology

This article introduces the issue of Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session entitled "Beyond Meditation: Mindfulness-Related Clinical Practices." In the article, I describe how the "sisters of mindfulness"-forgiveness, gratitude, loving-kindness, compassion, acceptance, and best-self visualization-are each interconnected and important forms of mindfulness as well as tenets of Buddhist psychology. Each of these practices reflect mental strengths that are being integrated into the brain's neuroplastic development as a function of modern day psychotherapy.

Author(s): 
Rosenzweig, Debra
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Psychology

This article discusses how loving-kindness can be used to treat traumatized refugees and minority groups, focusing on examples from our treatment, culturally adapted cognitive-behavioral therapy (CA-CBT). To show how we integrate loving-kindness with other mindfulness interventions and why loving-kindness should be an effective therapeutic technique, we present a typology of mindfulness states and the Nodal Network Model (NNM) of Affect and Affect Regulation.

Author(s): 
Hinton, Devon E.
Ojserkis, Rebecca A.
Jalal, Baland
Peou, Sonith
Hofmann, Stefan G.

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