Bulimia

Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Eating Disorders

OBJECTIVE: Understanding the factors that predict a favourable outcome following specialist treatment for an eating disorder may assist in improving treatment efficacy, and in developing novel interventions. This review and meta-analysis examined predictors of treatment outcome and drop-out. METHOD: A literature search was conducted to identify research investigating predictors of outcome in individuals treated for an eating disorder. We organized predictors first by statistical type (simple, meditational, and moderational), and then by category.

Author(s): 
Vall, Eva
Wade, Tracey D.
Publication Title: 
Eating Behaviors

Mindfulness-based approaches are growing in popularity as interventions for disordered eating and weight loss. Initial research suggests that mindfulness meditation may be an effective intervention for binge eating; however, no systematic review has examined interventions where mindfulness meditation was the primary intervention and no review has examined its effect on subclinical disordered eating or weight.

Author(s): 
Katterman, Shawn N.
Kleinman, Brighid M.
Hood, Megan M.
Nackers, Lisa M.
Corsica, Joyce A.
Publication Title: 
Appetite

Non-human animal studies demonstrate relationships between stress and selective intake of palatable food. In humans, exposure to laboratory stressors and self-reported stress are associated with greater food intake. Large studies have yet to examine chronic stress exposure and eating behavior. The current study assessed the relationship between stress (perceived and chronic), drive to eat, and reported food frequency intake (nutritious food vs. palatable non-nutritious food) in women ranging from normal weight to obese (N=457).

Author(s): 
Groesz, Lisa M.
McCoy, Shannon
Carl, Jenna
Saslow, Laura
Stewart, Judith
Adler, Nancy
Laraia, Barbara
Epel, Elissa
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Psycho-Analysis

The author suggests that eating disorders function to reinforce phantasies of control of the internal parents, a feature of Klein's view of the manic defence. Using this hypothesis, she attempts to differentiate between anorexia and bulimia. It is argued that in anorexia objects are felt to be permanently in thrall, suspended or frozen, whereas in bulimia they are attacked in a frenzied and intermittent way. Using case material from three seriously ill patients, the author draws attention to some important differences between them.

Author(s): 
Lawrence, M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Psychology

This article introduces the issue of Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session entitled "Beyond Meditation: Mindfulness-Related Clinical Practices." In the article, I describe how the "sisters of mindfulness"-forgiveness, gratitude, loving-kindness, compassion, acceptance, and best-self visualization-are each interconnected and important forms of mindfulness as well as tenets of Buddhist psychology. Each of these practices reflect mental strengths that are being integrated into the brain's neuroplastic development as a function of modern day psychotherapy.

Author(s): 
Rosenzweig, Debra
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Psychology

This article introduces the issue of Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session entitled "Beyond Meditation: Mindfulness-Related Clinical Practices." In the article, I describe how the "sisters of mindfulness"-forgiveness, gratitude, loving-kindness, compassion, acceptance, and best-self visualization-are each interconnected and important forms of mindfulness as well as tenets of Buddhist psychology. Each of these practices reflect mental strengths that are being integrated into the brain's neuroplastic development as a function of modern day psychotherapy.

Author(s): 
Rosenzweig, Debra
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Psychosomatics: Official Publication of the International Psychosomatics Institute

The details of an easily replicable intervention using hypnosis in the treatment of bulimia are presented. Follow-up data at one month, three months, six months, and one year indicated that the intervention appeared to be effective in two out of the three cases presented. Factors affecting treatment outcomes are discussed.

Author(s): 
Barabasz, M.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Psychosomatics: Official Publication of the International Psychosomatics Institute

The details of an easily replicable intervention using hypnosis in the treatment of bulimia are presented. Follow-up data at one month, three months, six months, and one year indicated that the intervention appeared to be effective in two out of the three cases presented. Factors affecting treatment outcomes are discussed.

Author(s): 
Barabasz, M.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

Promising research data, relating hypnotizability and the possible presence of a dissociative mechanism in bulimic individuals, stimulated the present authors to incorporate hypnosis in their directive and multidimensional treatment of bulimic patients. Important strategies and how and when they can be applied in the different phases of treatment are described. In many cases, hypnotherapeutic techniques may enhance the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral and interactional strategies in the treatment of bulimic patients.

Author(s): 
Vanderlinden, J.
Vandereycken, W.
Publication Title: 
Psychiatric Medicine

This paper reviews the literature on the use of hypnosis in the assessment and treatment of eating disorders. It proposes that patients with eating disorders ought to be investigated as to the underlying dynamics behind the eating disorders symptoms.

Author(s): 
Torem, M. S.

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