Calcium Compounds

Publication Title: 
Thyroid: Official Journal of the American Thyroid Association

BACKGROUND: Calcium carbonate is a commonly used dietary supplement and has been shown to interfere with levothyroxine absorption. However, calcium citrate, which is also used for supplementation purposes, has not been studied previously and calcium acetate, which is used to treat hyperphosphatemia in renal failure, has been reported to show little or no interference with levothyroxine absorption in a retrospective pharmacoepidemiologic study. We aimed to compare the effect of these three calcium formulations on levothyroxine absorption.

Author(s): 
Zamfirescu, Isabelle
Carlson, Harold E.
Publication Title: 
Thyroid: Official Journal of the American Thyroid Association

BACKGROUND: Calcium carbonate is a commonly used dietary supplement and has been shown to interfere with levothyroxine absorption. However, calcium citrate, which is also used for supplementation purposes, has not been studied previously and calcium acetate, which is used to treat hyperphosphatemia in renal failure, has been reported to show little or no interference with levothyroxine absorption in a retrospective pharmacoepidemiologic study. We aimed to compare the effect of these three calcium formulations on levothyroxine absorption.

Author(s): 
Zamfirescu, Isabelle
Carlson, Harold E.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the National Cancer Institute

Nutritional supplementation is now a multibillion-dollar industry, and about half of all US adults take supplements. Supplement use is fueled in part by the belief that nutritional supplements can ward off chronic disease, including cancer, although several expert committees and organizations have concluded that there is little to no scientific evidence that supplements reduce cancer risk. To the contrary, there is now evidence that high doses of some supplements increase cancer risk. Despite this evidence, marketing claims by the supplement industry continue to imply anticancer benefits.

Author(s): 
Martínez, María Elena
Jacobs, Elizabeth T.
Baron, John A.
Marshall, James R.
Byers, Tim
Publication Title: 
Journal of the National Cancer Institute

BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies on the relationship between vitamin intake and liver cancer risk are sparse and inconsistent. METHODS: We evaluated vitamin intake from diet and supplements and risk of liver cancer in 132,837 women and men from China who were recruited into the Shanghai Women's Health Study from 1997 to 2000 or the Shanghai Men's Health Study from 2002 to 2006. In-person interviews, using a validated food-frequency questionnaire, were conducted to collect data on dietary habits. Follow-up consisted of in-person surveys and record linkage.

Author(s): 
Zhang, Wei
Shu, Xiao-Ou
Li, Honglan
Yang, Gong
Cai, Hui
Ji, Bu-Tian
Gao, Jing
Gao, Yu-Tang
Zheng, Wei
Xiang, Yong-Bing
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