Caloric Restriction

Publication Title: 
Microscopy Research and Technique

Caloric restriction (CR) may retard aging processes and extend lifespan in organisms by altering energy-metabolic pathways. In CR rodents, glucose influx into tissues is not reduced, as compared with control animals fed ad libitum (AL), although plasma concentrations of glucose and insulin are lower. Gene expression profiles in rodents have suggested that CR promotes gluconeogenesis and fatty acid biosynthesis in skeletal muscle. In the liver, CR promotes gluconeogenesis but decreases fatty acid synthesis and glycolysis.

Author(s): 
Yamaza, Haruyoshi
Chiba, Takuya
Higami, Yoshikazu
Shimokawa, Isao
Publication Title: 
Microscopy Research and Technique

For nearly 70 years it has been recognized that reduction in caloric intake by 30-40% from ad libitum levels leads to a significant extension of mean and maximal lifespan in a variety of short-lived species. This effect of caloric restriction (CR) on lifespan has been reported in nearly all species tested and has been reproduced hundreds of times under a variety of different laboratory conditions. In addition to prolonging lifespan, CR also prevents or delays the onset of age-related disease and maintains many physiological functions at more youthful levels.

Author(s): 
Lane, Mark A.
Mattison, Julie
Ingram, Donald K.
Roth, George S.
Publication Title: 
Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy = BiomÈdecine & PharmacothÈrapie

Caloric restriction (CR) and a reduced growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) axis are associated with an extension of lifespan across taxa. Evidence is reviewed showing that CR and reduced insulin of GH-IGF-1 axis may exhibit their effects at least partly by their common stimulatory action on autophagy, the cell repair mechanism responsible for the housekeeping of cell membranes and organelles including the free radical generators peroxisomes and mitochondria.

Author(s): 
Bergamini, E.
Cavallini, G.
Donati, A.
Gori, Z.
Publication Title: 
Advances in Gerontology = Uspekhi Gerontologii / Rossi?skai?a Akademii?a Nauk, Gerontologicheskoe Obshchestvo

A review of biochemical mechanisms underlying the known approaches to extension of lifespan and/or slowing down of ageing suggests that they all modify balances between generation of active oxygen and carbonyl species and the mechanisms that protect from their damaging effects or repair their consequences. A likely common target of the geroprotector effects of antioxidants, melatonin, and antidiabetic biguanides is the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

Author(s): 
Golubev, A. G.
Publication Title: 
Nature

Calorie restriction extends lifespan in organisms ranging from yeast to mammals. In yeast, the SIR2 gene mediates the life-extending effects of calorie restriction. Here we show that the mammalian SIR2 orthologue, Sirt1 (sirtuin 1), activates a critical component of calorie restriction in mammals; that is, fat mobilization in white adipocytes. Upon food withdrawal Sirt1 protein binds to and represses genes controlled by the fat regulator PPAR-gamma (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma), including genes mediating fat storage.

Author(s): 
Picard, FrÈdÈric
Kurtev, Martin
Chung, Namjin
Topark-Ngarm, Acharawan
Senawong, Thanaset
Machado De Oliveira, Rita
Leid, Mark
McBurney, Michael W.
Guarente, Leonard
Publication Title: 
Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The focus of this review is on current research involving long-term calorie restriction and the resulting changes observed in possible biomarkers of aging. Special emphasis will be given to the basic and clinical science studies which are currently investigating the effects of controlled, high-quality energy-restricted diets on both biomarkers of longevity and on the development of chronic diseases related to age and obesity in humans.

Author(s): 
Smith, Julie V.
Heilbronn, Leonie K.
Ravussin, Eric
Publication Title: 
Mechanisms of Ageing and Development

It is widely held that caloric restriction (CR) extends lifespan by preventing or reducing the age-related accumulation of irreversible molecular damage. In contrast, our results suggest that CR can act rapidly to begin life and health span extension, and that its rapid genomic effects are closely linked to its health effects. We found that CR begins to extend lifespan and reduce cancer as a cause of death within 8 weeks in older mice, apparently by reducing the rate of tumor growth.

Author(s): 
Spindler, Stephen R.
Publication Title: 
Biogerontology

Experimentally imposed calorie restriction (CR) is shown to result in the most reproducible endpoint of lifespan extension in all animals models tested. In this presentation, the question of CR's effect on human longevity is reviewed by discussing data pertinent to the putative efficacy of CR on humans. Arguments are presented in support of this possibility based on CR's unique abilities to retard biological functional declines and to deter pathological processes, both of which are major targets of deleterious oxidative stress.

Author(s): 
Yu, Byung Pal
Publication Title: 
Rejuvenation Research

Evolutionary theory has guided the development of antiaging interventions in some conscious and some unconscious ways. It is a standard assumption that the body's health has been optimized by natural selection, and that the most benign and promising medical strategies should support the body's efforts to maintain itself. The very concept of natural healing is a reflection of evolutionary thinking about health.

Author(s): 
Mitteldorf, Josh
Publication Title: 
Biogerontology

Caloric (or dietary) restriction (CR) extends lifespan and lowers risk for age associated diseases in a phylogenetically diverse group of species. Whether prolonged CR increases average or maximum lifespan or promotes a more youthful physiology in humans at advanced ages is not yet known. However, available epidemiological evidence indicates that CR may already have contributed to an extension of average and maximum life span in one human population and appears to have lowered risk for age associated chronic diseases in other human populations.

Author(s): 
Willcox, D. Craig
Willcox, Bradley J.
Todoriki, Hidemi
Curb, J. David
Suzuki, Makoto

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