Caloric Restriction

Publication Title: 
Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology

Calorie restriction (CR) is a non-genetic manipulation that reliably results in extended lifespan of several species ranging from yeast to dogs. The lifespan extension effect of CR has been strongly associated with an increased level and activation of the silent information regulator 2 (Sir2) histone deacetylase and its mammalian ortholog Sirt1. This association led to the search for potential Sirt1-activating, life-extending molecules. This review briefly outlines the experimental findings on resveratrol and other dietary activators of Sirt1.

Author(s): 
Allard, Joanne S.
Perez, Evelyn
Zou, Sige
de Cabo, Rafael
Publication Title: 
Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology

Laboratory studies consistently demonstrate extended lifespan in animals on calorie restriction (CR), where total caloric intake is reduced by 10-40% but adequate nutrition is otherwise maintained. CR has been further shown to delay the onset and severity of chronic diseases associated with aging such as cancer, and to extend the functional health span of important faculties like cognition. Less understood are the underlying mechanisms through which CR might act to induce such alterations.

Author(s): 
Minor, Robin K.
Chang, Joy W.
de Cabo, Rafael
Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

We describe a new chronological lifespan (CLS) assay for the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Yeast CLS assays monitor the loss of cell viability in a culture over time, and this new assay shows a continuous decline in viability without detectable regrowth until all cells in the culture are dead. Thus, the survival curve is not altered by the generation of mutants that can grow during the experiments, and one can monitor the entire lifespan of a strain until the number of viable cells has decreased over 10(6)-fold.

Author(s): 
Chen, Bo-Ruei
Runge, Kurt W.
Publication Title: 
Nihon Rinsho. Japanese Journal of Clinical Medicine

Exciting recent findings are remarkable extension of lifespan of model animals in which single genes are mutated. Studies on model animals have provided valuable as well as limited and often misleading information in understanding human aging and anti-aging practice. It is important to realize that extension of lifespan and retardation of aging processes are two different things in principle, the latter being apparently more important for improving QOL in human. Discussed here are selected topics on the limitation of model animal studies and potential problems of popular anti-oxidants.

Author(s): 
Goto, Sataro
Publication Title: 
Aging Cell

Significant extension of lifespan in important mammalian species is bound to attract the attention not only of the aging research community, but also the media and the wider public. Two recent papers published by Harrison et al. (2009) in Nature and by Colman et al. (2009) in Science report increased longevity of mice fed with rapamycin and of rhesus monkeys undergoing caloric restriction, respectively. These papers have generated considerable debate in the aging community.

Author(s): 
Cox, Lynne S.
Mattison, Julie A.
Publication Title: 
Rejuvenation Research

Can we extend human lifespan? Do we need to regulate lifestyle choices or can we simply pop a pill to make us live longer? These are questions raised by two new studies demonstrating significant lifespan extension in mice fed the drug rapamycin in their diet and in calorically restricted rhesus monkeys.

Author(s): 
Cox, Lynne S.
Publication Title: 
Ageing Research Reviews

Caloric restriction (CR), reduced protein, methionine, or tryptophan diets; and reduced insulin and/or IGFI intracellular signaling can extend mean and/or maximum lifespan and delay deleterious age-related physiological changes in animals. Mice and flies can shift readily between the control and CR physiological states, even at older ages. Many health benefits are induced by even brief periods of CR in flies, rodents, monkeys, and humans. In humans and nonhuman primates, CR produces most of the physiologic, hematologic, hormonal, and biochemical changes it produces in other animals.

Author(s): 
Spindler, Stephen R.
Publication Title: 
FASEB journal: official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Cancer cells metabolize glucose at elevated rates and have a higher sensitivity to glucose reduction. However, the precise molecular mechanisms leading to different responses to glucose restriction between normal and cancer cells are not fully understood. We analyzed normal WI-38 and immortalized WI-38/S fetal lung fibroblasts and found that glucose restriction resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in WI-38/S cells, whereas it induced lifespan extension in WI-38 cells.

Author(s): 
Li, Yuanyuan
Liu, Liang
Tollefsbol, Trygve O.
Publication Title: 
Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta

Ageing can be defined as "a progressive, generalized impairment of function, resulting in an increased vulnerability to environmental challenge and a growing risk of disease and death". Ageing is likely a multifactorial process caused by accumulated damage to a variety of cellular components. During the last 20 years, gerontological studies have revealed different molecular pathways involved in the ageing process and pointed out mitochondria as one of the key regulators of longevity.

Author(s): 
Bratic, Ivana
Trifunovic, Aleksandra
Publication Title: 
Cell Cycle (Georgetown, Tex.)

Although it has been known since 1917 that calorie restriction (CR) decelerates aging, the topic remains highly controversial. What might be the reason? Here I discuss that the anti-aging effect of CR rules out accumulation of DNA damage and failure of maintenance as a cause of aging. Instead, it suggests that aging is driven in part by the nutrient-sensing TOR (target of rapamycin) network. CR deactivates the TOR pathway, thus slowing aging and delaying diseases of aging.

Author(s): 
Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

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