cancer

Publication Title: 
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinics of North America

Alternative exercise traditions (AETs) such as Pilates, yoga, Tai Chi Chuan, Qigong, and various forms of dance offer the potential to improve diverse outcomes among cancer survivors by reducing adverse symptoms and mood disorders, and by enhancing function. Additionally AETs have emerged as a potential means to address deficits in current disease-focused care delivery models which are marked by prevalent under-treatment of symptoms and physical impairments. Relative to therapeutic exercise in allopathic models, many AETs are comparatively affordable and accessible.

Author(s): 
Ruddy, Kathryn J.
Stan, Daniela L.
Bhagra, Anjali
Jurisson, Mary
Cheville, Andrea L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences

INTRODUCTION: Interest in the application of yoga for health benefits in western medicine is growing rapidly, with a significant rise in publications. The purpose of this systematic review is to determine whether the inclusion of yoga therapy to the treatment of breast cancer can improve the patient's physical and psychosocial quality of life (QoL). METHODS: A search of peer reviewed journal articles published between January 2009 and July 2014 was conducted.

Author(s): 
Galliford, Melissa
Robinson, Stephanie
Bridge, Pete
Carmichael, MaryAnn
Publication Title: 
Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer

PURPOSE: Reviews of yoga research that distinguish results of trials conducted during (versus after) cancer treatment are needed to guide future research and clinical practice. We therefore conducted a review of non-randomized studies and randomized controlled trials of yoga interventions for children and adults undergoing treatment for any cancer type. METHODS: Studies were identified via research databases and reference lists.

Author(s): 
Danhauer, Suzanne C.
Addington, Elizabeth L.
Sohl, Stephanie J.
Chaoul, Alejandro
Cohen, Lorenzo
Publication Title: 
Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary & Alternative Medicine

Cancer is acknowledged as a source of stress for many individuals, often leading to suffering, which can be long-lasting. Mindfulness-based stress reduction offers an effective way of reducing stress among cancer patients by combining mindfulness meditation and yoga in an 8-week training program. The purpose of this study was to inspect studies from October 2009 to November 2015 and examine whether mindfulness-based stress reduction can be utilized as a viable method for managing stress among cancer patients.

Author(s): 
Rush, Sarah E.
Sharma, Manoj
Publication Title: 
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing

Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) has deleterious effects on physical, social, cognitive, and vocational functioning, and causes emotional and spiritual distress for patients and their families; however, it remains under-recognized and undertreated. This article critically reviews and integrates the available empirical evidence supporting the efficacy of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment approaches to CRF, highlighting new evidence since 2007 and 2009 Putting Evidence Into Practice publications.

Author(s): 
Mitchell, Sandra A.
Hoffman, Amy J.
Clark, Jane C.
DeGennaro, Regina M.
Poirier, Patricia
Robinson, Carolene B.
Weisbrod, Breanna L.
Publication Title: 
European Medical Journal. Oncology

Many cancer patients and survivors, between 15 to 90%, report some form of insomnia or sleep quality impairment during and post-treatment, such as excessive daytime napping, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, and waking up too early. Insomnia and sleep quality impairment are among the most prevalent and distressing problems reported by cancer patients and survivors, and can be severe enough to increase cancer mortality. Despite the ubiquity of insomnia and sleep quality impairment, they are under-diagnosed and under-treated in cancer patients and survivors.

Author(s): 
Mustian, Karen M.
Publication Title: 
Explore (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: Fatigue is one of the most frequently reported, distressing side effects reported by cancer survivors and often has significant long-term consequences. Research indicates that yoga can produce invigorating effects on physical and mental energy, and thereby may improve levels of fatigue. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the literature that reports the effects of randomized, controlled yoga interventions on self-reported fatigue in cancer patients and survivors.

Author(s): 
Sadja, Julie
Mills, Paul J.
Publication Title: 
British Journal of Nursing (Mark Allen Publishing)

Regular reflective practice group sessions, focusing on enhancing mindfulness, were piloted as part of a support programme for researchers in a clinical oncology setting. METHODS: As a previous systematic review highlighted a wide variety of approaches and a lack of published evidence on the use of specific models for reflective practice in health care, a scoping review of existing literature describing reflective practice models preceded piloting the programme with the research team. The Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS) was used to assess the benefit for participants.

Author(s): 
Caley, Laura
Pittordou, Victoria
Adams, Carolyn
Gee, Caroline
Pitkahoo, Ville
Matthews, Jennifer
Cruse, Sarah
Muls, Ann
Publication Title: 
Radiotherapy and Oncology: Journal of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology

PURPOSE: Determining the appropriate rate of radiotherapy (RT) utilization is important for health care planning and resource allocation. The difference between the observed and the appropriate RT rate is influenced by the choice of a criterion based benchmarking (CBB) or evidence-based estimates (EBEST) measure.

Author(s): 
Shack, Lorraine
Lu, Shuang
Weeks, Lee-Anne
Craighead, Peter
Kerba, Marc
Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences

INTRODUCTION: Interest in the application of yoga for health benefits in western medicine is growing rapidly, with a significant rise in publications. The purpose of this systematic review is to determine whether the inclusion of yoga therapy to the treatment of breast cancer can improve the patient's physical and psychosocial quality of life (QoL). METHODS: A search of peer reviewed journal articles published between January 2009 and July 2014 was conducted.

Author(s): 
Galliford, Melissa
Robinson, Stephanie
Bridge, Pete
Carmichael, MaryAnn

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